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Full text of "Graduate School Bulletin"

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NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY 



Greensboro 




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GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 

1979-1980 




Vol. 68, No. 2 



July, 1979 



THE BULLETIN— Published seven times each year by North Carolina Agricultural 
and Technical State University, 312 N. Dudley St., Greensboro, North Carolina, 
27411. 

Second Class Postage paid at Greensboro, North Carolina 



NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY 



Greensboro 



GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 

1979-1980 



Graduate School Office 
Room 208— Dudley 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GENERAL INFORMATION 1 

Administrative Officers 1 

History 17 

Purpose 18 

Organization 18 

Degrees Granted 19 

ADMISSION AND OTHER INFORMATION 21 

Admission to Graduate Study 21 

Housing 21 

Food Services 21 

Financial Assistance 22 

Expenses 22 

Schedule of Deadlines 23 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 24 

Advising 24 

Class Loads 24 

Concurrent Registration in Other Institutions 24 

Grading System 24 

Professional Education Requirements for Class A Teaching Certificate 25 

Subject-Matter Requirements for Class A Teaching Certificate 25 

REGULATIONS FOR A MASTER'S DEGREE 25 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree 25 

Credit Requirements 26 

Time Limitation 26 

Course Levels 26 

Transfer of Credit 26 

Final Comprehensive Examination 27 

Options for Degree Program 27 

Master's Thesis and Format 28 

Application for Graduation 28 

Graduate Record Examinations 28 

Administrative Policy Concerning Changes in Requirements for Students Enrolled in Degree Programs 29 

Commencement 29 

Additional Regulations 29 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 30 

Master of Science in Adult Education 31 

Master of Science in Agricultural Education 31 

Master of Science in Biology 32 

Master of Science Degree in Chemistry 34 

Master of Science Degree in Education 35 

Master of Science Degree in Engineering 43 

Master of Science Degree in Food and Nutrition 44 

Master of Science Degree in Industrial Education 47 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 48 

Administration, Supervision and Postsecondary Education 48 

Adult Education 50 

Agricultural Education 52 

Animal Science 54 

Art 55 

Biology 57 

Chemistry 62 

Economics 67 

Educational Media 70 

Educational Psychology and Guidance 73 

Elementary Education and Reading 75 

Engineering 78 

English 86 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 92 

History 93 

Social Science 94 

Philosophy 96 

Geography 96 

Home Economics 97 

Industrial Education 101 

Industrial Technology 103 

Mathematics 104 

Music 108 

Physics 109 

Plant Science and Technology 109 

Political Science 112 

Safety and Driver Education 114 

Speech and Drama 118 

Sociology and Social Service 118 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Sixteen Constituent Institutions 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Raymond Howard Dawson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President, 

Academic Affairs 

L. Felix Joyner, A.B., Vice President — Finance 

John L. Sanders, A.B., J.D., Vice President — Planning 

Cleon Franklyn Thompson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President— 

Student Services and Special Programs 

George Eldridge Bair, B. A., M. A., Ph.D., Director of 

Educational Television 
Charles Ray Coble, Jr., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President- 
Planning 

James L. Jenkins, Jr., A.B Assistant to the President 

Edgar Walton Jones, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Vice President— 

Research and Public Service 

John P. Kennedy, Jr., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 

Arnold Kimsey King, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant to the President 

Roscoe D. McMillan, Jr., B.S., Assistant to the President for 

Governmental Affairs 

Richard H. Robinson, Jr., A.B., LL.B Assistant to the President 

Robert W. Williams, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate Vice President- 
Academic Affairs 



The University of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors to stu- 
dents at its Chapel Hill campus in 1795. Throughout most of its history, it has been 
governed by a Board of Trustees chosen by the Legislature and presided over by the 
Governor. During the period 1917-1972, the Board consisted of one hundred elected 
members and a varying number of ex-officio members. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931, without change of name, it was merged 
with The North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro and The North Carolina 
State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh to form a multicampus in- 
stitution designated The University of North Carolina. 

In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel Hill to 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greensboro to The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the name of the campus at 
Raleigh was changed to North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 
1965, and, in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington College became The 
University of North Carolina at Asheville and The University of North Carolina at 
Wilmington respectively. 

A revision of the North Carolina State Constitution adopted in November 1970 in- 
cluded the following: "The General Assembly shall maintain a public system of higher 
education, comprising The University of North Carolina and such other institutions of 
higher education as the General Assembly may deem wise. The General Assembly 
shall provide for the selection of trustees of The University of North Carolina. . . ." In 
slightly different language, this provision had been in the Constitution since 1868. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly in special session merged, without 
changing their names, the remaining ten state-supported senior institutions into the 
University as follows: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, 
Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Agri- 
cultural and Technical State University, North Carolina Central University, North 



Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina Univer- 
sity, and Winston-Salem State University. This merger, which resulted in a statewide 
multicampus university of sixteen constituent institutions, became effective on July 1, 
1972. 

The constitutionally authorized Board of Trustees was designated the Board of 
Governors, and the number was reduced to thirty-two members elected by the 
General Assembly, with authority to choose their own chairman and other officers. 
The Board is "responsible for the general determination, control, supervision, manage- 
ment, and governance of all affairs of the constituent institutions." Each constituent 
institution, however, has its own board of trustees of thirteen members, eight of 
whom are appointed by the Board of Governors, four by the Governor, and one of 
whom, the elected president of the student body, serves ex officio. The principal 
powers of each institutional board are exercised under a delegation from the Board of 
Governors. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed by a chan- 
cellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and appropriate alloca- 
tion of function are effected by the Board of Governors and by the President with the 
assistance of other administrative officers of the University. The General Administra- 
tion office is located in Chapel Hill. 

The chancellors of the constituent institutions are responsible to the President as 
the chief administrative and executive officer of The University of North Carolina. 

The General Assembly of North Carolina voted to elevate the College to the status of 
a Regional University effective July 1, 1967. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly ratified an Act to consolidate the In- 
stitutions of Higher Learning in North Carolina. Under the provisions of this Act, 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University became a constituent in- 
stitution of The University of North Carolina effective July 1, 1972. 

Six presidents have served the institution since it was founded in 1891. They are as 
follows: Dr. J. 0. Crosby, (1892-1896), Dr. James B. Dudley, (1896-1925), Dr. F. D. 
Bluford, (1925-1955), Dr. Warmoth T. Gibbs, (1956-1960), Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor, 
(1960-1964), and Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy, who was elected President April 10, 1964. 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University was established as the 
"A. and M. College for the Colored Race" by an act of the General Assembly of North 
Carolina ratified March 9, 1891. The act read in part: 

That the leading object of the institution shall be to teach practical agri- 
culture and the mechanic arts and such branches of learning as relate 
thereto, not excluding academical and classical instruction. 

The College began operation during the school year of 1890-91, before the passage of 
the state law creating it. This curious circumstance arose out of the fact that the 
Morrill Act passed by Congress in 1890 earmarked the proportionate funds to be 
allocated in bi-racial school systems to the two races. The A. and M. College for the 
White Race was established by the State Legislature in 1889 and was ready to receive 
its share of funds provided by the Morrill Act in the Fall of 1890. Before the college 
could receive these funds, however, it was necessary to make provisions for Colored 
students. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees of the A. and M. College in Raleigh was 
empowered to make temporary arrangements for these students. A plan was worked 
out with Shaw University in Raleigh where the College operated as an annex to Shaw 
University during the years 1890-1891, 1891-1892, and 1892-1893. 

The law of 1891 also provided that the College would be located in such city or town 
in the State as would make to the Board of Trustees a suitable proposition that would 
serve as an inducement for said location. A group of interested citizens in the city of 
Greensboro donated fourteen acres of land for a site and $11,000 to aid in constructing 
buildings. This amount was supplemented by an appropriations of $2,500 from the 
General Assembly. The first building was completed in 1893 and the College opened in 
Greensboro during the fall of that year. 

In 1915 the name of the institution was changed to The Agricultural and Technical 
College of North Carolina by an Act of the State Legislature. 

The scope of the college program has been enlarged to take care of new demands. 
The General Assembly authorized the institution to grant the Master of Science 
degree in education and certain other fields in 1939. The first Master's degree was 
awarded in 1941. The School of Nursing was established by an Act of the State 
Legislature in 1953 and the first class was graduated in 1957. 

The General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the purpose of the College 
in 1957, and redefined its purpose as follows: 

"The primary purpose of the College shall be to teach the Agricultural and 
Technical Arts and Sciences and such branches of learning as related 
thereto; the training of teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the 
public schools of the State, including the preoaration of such teachers, 
supervisors and administrators for the Master's degree. Such other pro- 
grams of a professional or occupational nature may be offered as shall be ap- 
proved by the North Carolina Board of Higher Education, consistent with 
the appropriations made therefor." 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND 
TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Carson Bain Greensboro 

Marshall B. Bass Winston-Salem 

Lacy H. Caple Lexington 

Betty Cone Greensboro 

Wilbert Greenfield Charlotte 

C. C. Griffin Concord 

Robert Kraay Greensboro 

Richard D. Levy Greensboro 

John H. McArthur, Jr Wakulla 

David W. Morehead Greensboro 

Angeline Smith Greensboro 

Otis E. Tillman High Point 

Tony Graham Winston-Salem 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Lewis C. Dowdy, A.B., M.A., Ed.D. Litt.D Chancellor 

Glenn F. Rankin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Plummer Alston, Jr., B.S., M.B.A Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

Albert E. Smith, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Development 

and University Relations 

Theodore Mahaffey, B.S., M.B. A., Ph.D Administrative Assistant 

to the Chancellor 

Howard Robinson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Director of Research Administration 

W. Archie Blount, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Director of Institutional Research 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Glenn F. Rankin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Willie T. Ellis, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistance Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs 

Florentine V. Sowell, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D Assistant to the Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 

Suresh Chandra, B.Sc, M.Ch.E., Ph.D Dean, School of Engineering 

Quiester Craig, B.A., M.B. A., Ph.D Dean, School of Business and Economics 

Frank H. White, B.S., A.M., Ph.D Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

S. Joseph Shaw, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Education 

Albert W. Spruill, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean, The Graduate School 

B. C. Webb, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, School of Agriculture 

Naomi W. Wynn, B.S., M.A Dean, School of Nursing 

J. Niel Armstrong, B.S., A.M Director of Summer School 

Tommie M. Young, B.A., M.A.L.S., Ph.D Director of Library Services 

Rudolph Artis, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Director of Registration and Records 

Lt. Colonel Monroe J. Fuller Professor of Aerospace Studies 

Lt. Colonel John D. Jones, B.S., M.S Professor of Military Science 

6 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

William C. Parker, Jr., B.S., M.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Dean of Student Affairs 

for Service 

William Goode, B.S Dean of Student Affairs for Student 

Management and Human Relatio?is 

Lucille Piggott, B.S., M.Ed Dean of Student Affairs for Student Life 

Robert L. Wilson, A.B., M.S., Ph.D Director of Counseling Services 

William H. Gamble, B.S Director of Admissions 

Leon Warren, B.S., M.S Acting Director of Career Planning and Placement 

Ralph Ross, B. A., B.S., B.D Director of Religious Activities 

Sullivan Welborne, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Director of Memorial Union 

Joseph Bennett, B.S., M.S Director of Career Education 

Anne C. Graves, B.S., M.S Director of International Student Affairs 

Eddie Hargrove, B.S., M.S Director of Veterans and 

Handicapped Student Affairs 

Thelma Vines, B.S., M.S Director of Health Services 

FISCAL AFFAIRS 

Plummer Alston, Jr., B.S., M.B.A Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs 

Clara J. Pinkney, B.S., M.S Director of Accounting 

James E. Garfield, B.S., M.S Director of Auxiliary Services 

Doris D. Canada, B.S Director of Personnel 

Maxine D. Davis, B.S., M.Ed Director of Purchasing 

Nathaniel Hall, B.S Director of Contracts and Grants 

Gerard E. Gray, B.S., M.S Director of Physical Plant 

DEVELOPMENT 

Albert E. Smith, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Development 

and University Relations 

Shirley T. Frye, B.S., M.S Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for 

Development and University Relations 

Joseph D. Williams, B.S., M.S Associate Director of Development and 

University Relations for Alumni Affairs 

Richard Moore, B.S., M.S Associate Director of Development arid 

University Relations for Information Services 

Joseph Faust, A.B Director of Sports Information 

Harold L. Lanier, B.S., M.S Director of Cooperative Education 

OFFICER EMERITUS 

Warmoth T. Gibbs, A.B., Ed.M., LL.D President Emeritus 

GRADUATE COUNCIL 

1978-1979 

Albert W. Spruill, Ed.D., Dean of Graduate School, Chairman 
Glenn F. Rankin, Ed.D., Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Jimmy I. Barber, M.A., Faculty Representative 
Isaac Barnett, Ph.D., Director of Safety and Driver Education 



Arthur P. Bell, Ed.D., Chairman, Department of Agricultural Education 

Frank Bell, Ph.D., Acting Chairman, Department of History and Social Science 

Suresh Chandra, Ph.D., Dean, School of Engineering 

William J. Craft, Ph.D., Faculty Representative 

James Colston, Ph.D., Chairman, Administration, Supervision and Post-Secondary 

Education 
William DeLauder, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Chemistry 
Wanda Doby, Student Representative 
Samuel J. Dunn, Ph.D., Faculty Representative 
Sidney Evans, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Economics 
George C. Gail, M.S., Chairman, Department of Industrial Education 
William Gamble, B.S., Director of Admissions 
Seetha Ganapathy, Ph.D., Faculty Representative 
Alfonso E. Gore, Ed.D., Faculty Representative 
Arthur Hicks, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Biology 
B. W. Harris, Ed.D., Chairman, Adult Education and Community Services 
LeRoy F. Holmes, A.M., Chairman, Department of Art 
Steve Jones, Student Representative 

Wendell P. Jones, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Mathematics 
Wyatt Kirk, Ed.D., Chairman, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance 
Maurice Kpeglo, Student Representative 
Patricia Lynch, Student Representative 

Harold Mazyck, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Home Economics 
Roy D. Moore, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Health and Physical Education 
Dorothy Prince Barnett, Ed.D., Chairman, Department of Secondary Education and 

Curriculum 
Myrtle B. Sampson, Ed.D., Faculty Representative 
S. Joseph Shaw, Ph.D., Dean, School of Education 
Ricky Spain, Student Representative 

Marian Vick, Ed.D., Chairman, Department of Elementary Education and Reading 
Jimmy L. WHliams, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of English 
Ralph L. Wooden, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Educational Media 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Ali Abul-Fadl, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Idaho 

Elias G. Abu-Sabu (PE), Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering 

B.M.E., American University of Beirut; M.S.C.E., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnical 
Institute 

Sandra C. Alexander, Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Winser E. Alexander, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University, M.S., Ph.D., University of New 
Mexico 

Dorothy J. Alston, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., North Carolina State University; Ed.D., The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Charles E. Bailey, Jr., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., J. C. Smith University; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



Jimmie I. Barber, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University 

Dorothy Prince Barnett, Professor of Secondary Education and Curriculum 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Syracuse University; Ed.D., Indiana University 

Isaac Barnett, Professor of Safety and Driver Education 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College; Ed.D., Michigan State University 

Arthur P. Bell, Professor of Agricultural Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Frank Bell, Professor of History 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Richard Bennett, Jr., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Morehouse College; Ph.D., The University of California at Santa Barbara 

Brian J. Benson, Professor of English 

A.B., Guilford College; M.A., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 
Ph.D., The University of South Carolina 

Marion Blair, Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Indiana University 

W. Archie Blount, Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Gladys F. Blue, Associate Professor of Elementary Education and Reading 

B.M., William Ette University; M.M., University of Rochester; Ph.D., University 
of Ackron 

Bolinda N. Borah, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Cotton College, India; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State University 

Botros M. Botros, P.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Alexandria University, United Arab Republic; M.Eng'g., Ph.D., Sheffield 
University 

Ernest Bradford, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Morehouse College; B.D., Morehouse College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Nebraska 

Pearl Bradley, Associate Professor of Speech and Drama 

B.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- 
sity 

Henry T. Cameron, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., Fairfield University; Ed.D., University 
of Massachusettes 

Suresh Chandra, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Allahabad University; B.Sc, Banaras Hindu University; M.Ch.E., Univer- 
sity of Louisville; Ph.D., Colorado State University 

David Y. Chen, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 

C. N. Cheng, Associate Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., National Taiwan University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Urbana 



Arlington W. Chisman, Associate Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.Ed., Virginia State College; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity 

Naiter Chopra, Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc, Hons., M.S. Hons., University of Punjab; Ph.D., University of Dublin 

Basil Coley, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois 

William J. Craft, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., North Carolina State University; M.C., Ph.D., Clemson University 

John Crawford, Professor of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Amarendranath Datta, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.N.E., National Council on Education; M.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

James Dawkins, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania 

William DeLauder, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Morgan State College; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Octavia Diaz, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Doctorate in Mathematics and Physics, University of Havana 

Irma C. Douglas, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., LeMoyne-Owens College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

L. C. Dowdy, Professor of Education 

A.B., Allen University; M.A., Indiana State University; Ed.D., University of 
Indiana 

Samuel J. Dunn, Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Oregon State College 

Willie T. Ellis, Professor of Agricultural Education 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Sidney Evans, Professor of Economics 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity 

George Filatovs, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Washington University at St. Louis; Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla 

Charles Fountain, Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University 

George Gail, Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Minnesota 

Seetha Ganapathy, Professor of Nutrition and Research 

B.S., University of Mysore; Ph.D., University of Bombay 

Henry Goodman, Associate Professor of Adult Education 

B.S., M.Ed., East Carolina University; Ed.D., North Carolina State University 



10 



Alfonso Gore, Professor of Education 

B.S., Bluefield State College; A.M., West Virginia University; Ed.D., Boston Uni- 
versity 

Ruth M. Gore, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance 
B.S., Livingstone; M.S., West Virginia University 

Michael E. Greene, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Joseph Grundler, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Vallie Guthrie, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.S., Fisk University; Ed.D., 
American University 

Herbert Heughan, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.A., Hampton Institute 

Alfred Hill, Professor of Biology 

B.S., Prairie View College; M.A., Colorado A. and M. College; Ph.D., Kansas State 
University 

Nancy Hinckley, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.A., Trenton State College; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Leroy Holmes, Associate Professor of Art 

A.B., Howard University; A.M., Harvard University 

W. J. House, Professor of Education 
A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Duke University 

Norman Jarrard, Professor of English 

A.B., Salem College; M.A., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
Ph.D., University of Texas 

James L. Jenkins, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Dong Juen Jeong, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Teachers College, Kyung-Pook National University, Korea; M.A., Kyung- 
Pook National University; M.A., University of Hawaii; Ph.D., Wayne State Uni- 
versity 

Frissell Jones, Professor of Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.Ed., D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

Wendell P. Jones, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Jagadish R. Joshi, Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering 

B.E., Gujarat University; M.S., Roorkee University; M.S., University of Illinois; 
Ph.D., Stanford University 

Anwar S. Khan, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Punjab; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Alice Kidder, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



11 



John M. Kilimanjaro, Professor of Speech and Drama 

B.A., University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff; M.A., Ed.D., University of Arkansas 
at Fayetteville 

Wyatt D. Kirk, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Western Michigan University 

David E. Klett, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Michigan State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida 

Valena H. Lee, Assistant Professor of Educational Media and Technology 
B.A., St. Augustine's College; M.S., M.L.S., Indiana University 

Robert T. Levine, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Queens College; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Frances Logan, Professor of Sociology and Social Service 

B.S., Ed.M., Temple University; M.S.W., D.S.W., University of Pennsylvania 

Eugene Marrow, Professor of Biology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ph.D., The Catholic University of America 

Jesse E. Marshall, Professor of Guidance 

B.S., Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity 

Dorothy Mason, Professor of History 

A.B., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., University of 
Georgia; Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Aurelia C. Mazyck, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance 
B.S., Howard University; M.S., N. Y. University; Ph.D., The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Harold Mazyck, Professor of Child Development and Counselor Education 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Joseph W. McPherson, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., Guilford College; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University 

Peter V. Meyers, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Rutger's, The State University 

Roy D. Moore, Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Lawrence B. Morse, Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

James G. Nutsch, Associate Professor of History 

B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas 

David E. Olson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Michigan Technical University; Ph.D., University of Utah 

Howard Pearsall, Professor of Music 

B.S., Fisk University; M.A., Western Reserve University; Ed.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity 

Charles W. Pinckney, Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., University of Illinois; D.Ed., 
Pennsylvania State University 



12 



Robert B. Pyle, Associate Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.A., M.S., Trenton State College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Jothi Ramasamy, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc, Annamalai University, Cdm., India; Ph.D., Kansas State University 

Glenn F. Rankin, Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Richard D. Robbins, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University at Raleigh 

Howard F. Robinson, Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Randa Russell, Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Kentucky State College; M.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michi- 
gan; M.P.H., University of Minnesota; Ed.D., University of Michigan 

Myrtle Sampson, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance 
B.S., M.L.S., North Carolina Central University; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. 
State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Donald Schaefer, Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill 

Chung- Woon Seo, Associate professor of Food and Nutrition 

B.S., M.S., Korea University; Ph.D., The Florida State University 

Karen J. Sepsi, Assistant Professor of Elementary Education and Reading 
B.S., M.S., California State College; Ed.D., University of Cincinnati 

Avva Sharma, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Saugor University; D.M.I.T., Madras Institute of Technology; M.S., 
Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Sarla Sharma, Professor of Psychology and Guidance 

B.A., Banaras Hindu University; M.A., The University of Chicago; Ph.D., The 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

S. J. Shaw, Professor of Education 

B.S., Fayetteville State College; M.A., North Carolina College; Ph.D., The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Ernest Sherrod, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., M.S., A. and T. College 

Amarjit Singh, Associate Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Punjab University; LL.B., Delhi University; M.E.S., Ph.D., Claremount 
Graduate School 

Myrtle Smith, Professor of Clothing and Textiles 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Wilbur L. Smith, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 

Albert W. Spruill, Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ed.D., Cornell University 

Elias K. Stefanakos, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineeriyig 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Washington State University 



13 



Arthur Stevens, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Langston University; M.S., Oklahoma University 

William A. Streat, Professor of Architectural Engineering 

B.S., Hampton Institute; B.S., University of Illinois; S.M., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology 

Virgil Stroud, Professor of Political Science 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Jan A. Stulinsky, Professor of Architectural Engineering 

M.A., Polytechnic University; M.A., University of Capernicus; Doctor of 
Technical Science, Polytechnic University 

Ethel F. Taylor, Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Spelman College; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Avinash Tilak, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering 

B.T.M.E., Indian Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Texas Technical Univer- 
sity 

Richard Tucker, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State University 

Alphonso Vick, Professor of Botany 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University; M.S., North Carolina State at Durham; A.M., 
University of Michigan; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Marian Vick, Professor of Education 

B.S., Fayetteville State College; M.S., University of Michigan; C.A.G.S., Syracuse 
University; Ed.D., Duke University 

Alf reda Webb, Professor of Biology 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; D.V.M., Tuskegee 
Institute 

Burleigh C. Webb, Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity 

Ta-Hsien Wei, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Columbia 
University 

Sullivan Welborne, Assistant Professor of Administration and Post-secondary Edu- 
cation 
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; Ed.D., The University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro 

Frank White, Professor of History 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Ph.D., New York University 

Joseph White, Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina College; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

James A. Williams, Jr., Professor of Biology 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Brown University 

Jimmy L. Williams, Professor of English 

B.A., Clark College; M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Leo Williams, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois 

14 



Bernice Willis, Assistant Professor of Elementary Education and Reading 
B.A., M.A., Oberlin College; Ed.D., Duke University 

Ralph L. Wooden, Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College, M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Walter Wright, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina College; Ph.D., New York University 

Lee A. Yates, Assistant Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Chung Yu, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.Eng., McGill University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Victor Zaloom, Professor of Industrial Engineering 

B.S.I.E., M.S.E., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Houston 



15 



LOCATION 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is located in the City of 
Greensboro, North Carolina. This urban location puts major shopping centers, 
churches, theaters, medical facilities and transportation within convenient distance 
for the students. This location offers an advantage to many students who desire part- 
time employment while attending the University. 

The City of Greensboro offers a variety of cultural activities and recreational 
facilities. It has become known for its colleges and universities, art galleries, libraries 
and museum. 

The Memorial Auditorium attracts outstanding athletic events, concerts, and other 
popular events. The City offers facilities for bowling, boating, fishing, horseback 
riding, tennis and golf. 

THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

The university campus comprises modern, fire resistant buildings, all thoroughly 
maintained for the highest level of efficiency, located on land holdings in excess of 181 



UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 

Dudley Memorial Building (Administration) 

F. D. Bluford Library 

Harrison Auditorium 

Charles Moore Gymnasium 

Coltrane Hall (Headquarters for N. C. Agricultural Extension Service) 

Memorial Union 

The Oaks (President's Residence) 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Building 

CLASS ROOM AND LABORATORY BUILDINGS 

Carver Hall School of Agriculture 

Cherry Hall School of Engineering 

Crosby Hall School of Arts and Sciences 

Hodgin Hall School of Education 

Noble Hall School of Nursing 

Price Hall Division of Industrial Education and Technology 

Benbow Hall Home Economics 

Garret House Home Economics 

Hines Hall Chemistry 

Sockwell Hall Agricultural Technology 

Ward Hall Dairy Manufacturing 

Reid Greenhouses 

Graham Hall School of Engineering and Computer Science Center 

Frazier Hall Music- Art 

Price Hall Division of Industrial Education & Technology 

Price Hall Annex Child Development Laboratory 

Campbell Hall ROTC Headquarters 

Barnes Hall Biology 

Merrick Hall School of Business and Economics 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Curtis Hall (148) Morrison Hall (94) 

Gibbs Hall (200) Vanstory Hall (200) 

16 



High Rise Dormitory (East) (194) 
High Rise Dormitory (West) (208) 
Holland Hall (144) 



Cooper Hall (400) 
Scott Hall (1010) 
Senior Hall (200) 



SERVICE BUILDINGS 

Murphy Hall Student Services 

Brown Hall Cafeteria, Post Office, Student Financial Aid Office 

Sebastian Infirmary 

T. E. Neal Heating Plant 

Laundry-Dry Cleaning Plant 

Williams Hall Cafeteria 

Clyde Dehuguley Physical Plant Building 

OTHER FACILITIES 

University Farms — including 600 acres of land and modern farm buildings 

Athletic field— including three practice fields for football, quarter mile track, base- 
ball diamond and field house 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Students who complete one or more of the courses of study listed below will be 
awarded the degree indicated. 

GRADUATE DEGREES 



Adult Education— M.S. 

Agricultural Economics — M.S. 

Afro-American Literature — M.A. 

Agricultural Education — M.S. 

Art Education, Secondary — M.S. 

Educational Media— M.S. 

Biology— M.S. 

Biology, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Chemistry— M.S. 

Chemistry, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Driver and Safety Education — M.S. 

Education— M.S. 

Educational Administration and 

Supervision— M.S. 
Elementary Education, Early 

Childhood— M.S. 
Elementary Education, General — M.S. 
Electrical Engineering — M.S. 
Engineering — M.S. 



English and Afro American 

Literature — M.A. 
English, Secondary Education — M.S. 
Food and Nutrition— M.S. 
French, Education— M.S. 
Health and Physical Education — M.S. 
History, Secondary Education — M.S. 
Industrial Arts Education — M.S. 
Industrial Engineering — M.S. 
Intermediate Education (4-7) — M.S. 
Mathematics, Secondary 

Education— M.S. 
Physical Education — M.S. 
Reading Education — M.S. 
Social Science, Secondary 

Education— M.S. 
Student Personnel (Counseling 

Education; Guidance) — M.S. 
Vocational-Industrial Education— M.S. 



HISTORY 

Graduate education at North Carolina A. and T. State University was authorized by 
the North Carolina State Legislature in 1939. The authorization provided for training 
in agriculture, technology, applied science, and applied areas of study. An extension of 
the graduate program, approved by the General Assembly of North Carolina in 1957, 
provided for enlargement of the curriculum to include teacher education, as well as 
such other programs of a professional or occupational nature as might be approved by 
the North Carolina State Board of Higher Education. 



17 



On July 1, 1967, the legislature of North Carolina approved regional university 
status for the institution and renamed it North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University. The graduate responsibilities of the institution as a regional univer- 
sity are to prepare teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the master's degree, 
to offer master's degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences, and to conduct such 
other programs as are deemed necessary to meet the needs of its constituency and of 
the state. 

The University awarded its first master's degree in 1941 to Woodland Ellroy Hall. 
Since that time, several thousand students have received this coveted degree of ad- 
vanced studies. A significant number of these graduates have gone on to other univer- 
sities to achieve the prestigious doctorate degree in their chosen specialties. 

The Graduate School through its various disciplines is affiliated with The Ameri- 
can Chemical Society, Engineer's Council on Professional Development, The National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, The Council of Graduate Schools 
in The United States and other prestigious regional and national academic bodies. 

PURPOSE 

The Graduate School coordinates advanced course offerings of all departments 
within the School of Agriculture, the School of Education, the School of Arts and 
Sciences, and the School of Engineering. Thus, the Graduate School offers advanced 
study for qualified individuals who wish to improve their competence for careers in 
professions related to agriculture, humanities, education, social studies, science, and 
technology. Such study of information and techniques is provided through curricula 
leading to the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree and through institutes and 
workshops designed for those who are not candidates for a higher degree. Second, the 
Graduate School provides a foundation of knowledge and of techniques for those who 
wish to continue their education in doctoral programs at other institutions. Third, the 
Graduate School assumes the responsibility of encouraging scholarly research among 
students and faculty members. 

It is expected that, while studying at this university, graduate students (1) will ac- 
quire special competence in at least one field of knowledge; (2) will develop further 
their ability to think independently and constructively; (3) will develop and 
demonstrate the ability to collect, organize, evaluate, and report facts which will 
enable them to make a scholarly contribution to knowledge about their discipline; and 
(4) will make new applications and adaptations of existing knowledge so as to con- 
tribute to their profession and to human-kind. 

ORGANIZATION 
Graduate School Council 

The Graduate School Council is responsible for formulating all academic policies 
and regulations affecting graduate students, graduate courses, and graduate 
curricula. The council consists of the chairpersons of the departments offering concen- 
trations in graduate studies, the deans of the schools offering graduate instruction, 
the Director of the Summer School, the Dean of Academic Affairs, the Director of Ad- 
missions, Registration and Records, and the Director of Teacher Education, five 
graduate students elected from the Graduate Club, and five faculty members selected 
from the graduate faculty. The Dean of the Graduate School serves as chairperson of 
the council. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEES OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Standing committees of the Graduate School are organized to advise the council on 
matters pertaining to present policies, to evaluate existing and proposed programs of 



18 



study, and to process student petitions relating to academic matters. These commit- 
tees are: 

Committee on Admissions and Retention 
Committee on Curriculum 
Committee on Publications 
Committee on Rules and Policy 

DEGREES GRANTED 

The Graduate School of North Carolina A. and T. State University offers the follow- 
ing degrees: 

MASTER OF ARTS 

English and Afro-American Literature 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

1. Adult Education 

2. Agricultural Economics 

3. Biology 

4. Chemistry 

5. Electrical Engineering 

6. Engineering 

7. Food and Nutrition 

8. Industrial Engineering 

9. Specialized Teaching and Related Fields 

A. Administration, Supervision and Post-Secondary Education 

(1) Administration 

(2) Supervision 

B. Agricultural Education 

C. Educational Media 

D. Elementary Education and Reading 

(1) Early Childhood Education 

(2) Elementary Education 

(3) Intermediate Education 

(4) Reading 

E. Guidance or Counseling Education 

F. Industrial Education 

(1) Industrial Arts Education 

(2) Trade and Industrial Education 

G. Safety and Driver Education 

10. Specialized Secondary Education Teaching Fields with Majors in Subject Mat- 
ter Departments 

A. Art 

B. Biology 

C. Chemistry 

D. English 

E. History 

F. Mathematics 

G. Health and Physical Education 
H. Social Science 

Master of Science programs in Agricultural Education, Education and Industrial 
Education enable students to become eligible for the following certificates issued by 
the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction: 

1. Graduate Elementary Certificate 

2. Graduate Secondary Certificate 



19 



3. Administrator I (Master's degree) 

4. Curriculum Instructional Specialist 

5. Local Directors of Vocational Education 

6. Middle Grades Occupational Exploration 

7. Industrial Cooperative Training 



NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY 

NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY is dedicated to equality of oppor- 
tunity within its community. Accordingly, NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNI- 
VERSITY does not practice or condone discrimination, in any form, against students, 
employees, or applicants on the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, 
age, or handicap. NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY commits itself to 
positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of those characteristics. 

NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY supports the protections available 
to members of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI 
and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 
Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age Dis- 
crimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Executive Order 11246. 



20 



ADMISSION AND OTHER INFORMATION 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY 

All applicants for graduate study must have earned a bachelor's degree from a four- 
year college. Application forms must be submitted to the Graduate School Office with 
two transcripts of previous undergraduate and graduate studies. Processing of ap- 
plications cannot be guaranteed unless they are received, with all supporting docu- 
ments, in the Graduate Office at least fifteen days before a registration period. Appli- 
cants may be admitted to graduate studies unconditionally, provisionally, or as special 
students. Applicants are admitted without discrimination because of race, color, 
creed, or sex. 

Unconditional Admission 

To qualify for unconditional admission to graduate studies, an applicant must have 
earned an over-all average of 2.6 on a 4 point system (or 1.6 on a 3 point system) in 
his/her undergraduate studies. In addition, a student seeking a degree in Agricultural 
Education, Elementary Education, Industrial Education, or Secondary Education 
must possess, or be qualified to possess, a Class A Teaching Certificate in the area in 
which he/she wishes to concentrate his/her graduate studies. A student seeking a 
degree with concentration in Administration or Guidance must possess, or be 
qualified to possess, a Class A Teaching Certificate. 

Provisional Admission 

An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies on a provisional basis if (1) 
he/she earned his/her baccalaureate degree from a non-accredited institution or (2) 
the record of his/her undergraduate preparation reveals deficiences that can be 
removed near the beginning of his/her graduate study. A student admitted 
provisionally may be required to pass examinations to demonstrate his/her knowledge 
in specified areas, to take specified undergraduate courses to improve his/her 
background, or to demonstrate his/her competence for graduate work by earning no 
grades below "B" in his/her first nine hours of graduate work at this institution. 

Special Students 

Students not seeking a graduate degree at A. and T. may be admitted in order to 
take courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificate if said stu- 
dents meet standard Graduate School entrance requirements. If a student subse- 
quently wishes to pursue a degree program, he/she must request an evaluation of 
his/her record. The Graduate School reserves the right to refuse to accept towards a 
degree program credits which the candidate earned while enrolled as a special student; 
in no circumstances may the student apply towards a degree program more than 
twelve semester hours earned as a special student. 

HOUSING 

The university maintains six residence halls for women and three for men. A re- 
quest for dormitory housing accommodation should be directed to the Dean of Stu- 
dents at least sixty days prior to the expected date of registration. 

FOOD SERVICES 

The university provides food service for students at minimum cost. Two cafeterias 
and a snack bar are operated at convenient locations on the campus. Students who live 
in the residence halls are required to eat in the cafeterias. 



21 



RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION FOR PURPOSES OF 
APPLICABLE TUITION DIFFERENTIALS 

Residence classification for tuition purposes are set forth by law in North Carolina 
as follows: 

G. S. 116-143.1 (b) 
"To qualify for in-state tuition a legal resident must have maintained his domicile 
in North Carolina for at least the 12 months immediately prior to his classifica- 
tion as a resident for tuition purposes. In order to be eligible for such classifica- 
tion, the individual must establish that his or her presence in the State during 
such twelve-month period was for purposes of maintaining a bona fide domicile 
rather than for purposes of mere temporary resident incident to enrollment in an 
institution of higher education; further, (1) if the parents (or court-appointed 
legal guardian) of the individual seeking resident classification are (is) bona fide 
domiciliaries of this State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of domicilliary 
status of the individual applicant and (2) if such parents or guardian are not bona 
fide domiciliaries of this State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of non- 
domiciliary status of the individual. 
University regulations concerning the classification of students by residence, for 
purposes of applicable tuition differentials, are set forth in detail in A Manual To 
Assist The Public Higher Education Institutions of North Carolina in the Matter of 
Student Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes. Each student is responsible for 
knowing the contents of that Manual, which is the controlling administrative state- 
ment of policy on this subject. Copies of the Manual are available on request in The Of- 
fice of Admissions of A. and T. State University for purposes of student inspection. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Graduate Assistants 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified individuals. 
The student is assigned to assist a professor or a department twenty hours per week 
for the duration of the assistantship. Some graduate assistants are assigned to teach 
freshman classes. Normally, a graduate assistant will be assigned to teach only one 
class per semester, but he/she may be assigned to teach a maximum of two. The 
assistantship offers a stipend in addition to the funds required for tuition, fees, books, 
and board and lodging expenses for residence on campus. Application for an assist- 
antship must be made to the Dean of the Graduate School at least five months before 
fall registration. Only full-time graduate students are eligible. 

Other Assistance 

Funds, such as the National Defense Student Loan Fund, are available in limited 
quantity for students. Requests for informating concerning these funds should be 
directed to the Graduate School. 

EXPENSES 

The fee charged to a full-time student carrying nine or more semester hours of work 
are the same as those charged to full-time undergraduate students. For one academic 
year, a state resident should expect to pay $622.00 which will cover tuition and course 
fees; this sum does not include room and board charges. Tuition and course fees for an 
out-of-state student carrying a full schedule will total $2,327.00 for the academic year. 
Current room and board rates are $559.50 per semester. 

For the Summer, each in-state student pays $18.20 per credit hour for tuition and 
required fees; each out-of-state student pays $38.50 per credit hour for tuition and re- 
quired fees. Room and board are $26.75 per week. 

22 



As student fees are subject to change without prior notice, it is suggested that the 
Cashier's Office be consulted for complete information concerning charges for full and 
part-time students. 

Special Fees 

Fee for processing application (required only for first application 

for graduate studies) $10.00 

Late Registration 15.00 

Graduation fees: 

Diploma 15.00 

Regalia 15.00 

Transcript (after the first one) 1.00 

Master's thesis binding fee 20.00 

Auditing 

To audit a course, a student must obtain permission from the Dean of the Graduate 
School and must submit the necessary forms during the registration period. A part- 
time student must pay all fees, including tuition, that would be charged to a student 
taking the course for credit. A full-time student is not required to pay any additional 
fees for auditing. A change from "credit" registration to "audit" will not be permitted 
after the close of the deadline date for withdrawing from a course. An auditor is not 
required to participate in class discussions, prepare assignments, or take 
examinations. 

SCHEDULE OF DEADLINES 

The Graduate School provides schedules of specific dates for completing various re- 
quirements for a degree program. These notices are not sent to individuals 
automatically, but may be found in the calendar of the Graduate School, available 
upon request. 

REQUEST FOR GRADE REPORTS AND TRANSCRIPTS 

The Office of Registration and Records is the official record keeping office at the 
college. Requests for official statements regarding courses completed, grade reports, 
or transcripts should be directed to that office. 



23 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADVISING 

Until he/she is assigned to an advisor after he/she has been accepted as a candidate 
in a degree program, a graduate student is advised by a member of the graduate 
faculty appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student, however, should 
consult and follow the curriculum guide prepared for his/her area of concentration. 
Separate curriculum guide sheets are available in the office of the department offer- 
ing the concentration. They may be secured also from the Graduate School Office. 

"Special" students are advised by members of the graduate faculty appointed by the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

CLASS LOADS 

Full-Time Students 

Class loads for the full-time students may range from 9 to 15 semester hours during 
a regular session of the academic year. The maximum load is 15 semester hours. 

In-Service Teachers 

The maximum load for a fully employed in-service teacher must not exceed six 
semester hours during any academic year. 

University Staff 

The maximum load for any fully employed member of the university faculty or staff 
will be six semester hours for the academic year. 

CONCURRENT REGISTRATION IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

A student registered in a degree program in this Graduate School may not enroll 
concurrently in another graduate school except upon permission, secured in advance, 
from the Dean of the Graduate School. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Grades for graduate students are recorded as follows: A, excellent; B, average; C, 
below average; F, failure; S, work in progress (for courses in research); I, INCOM- 
PLETE; W, withdrawal. 

1. In order to earn a degree, a student must have a cumulative average of "B," (a 
grade point average of 3.0 on a system in which 1 hour of A earns 4 grade points). 

2. A graduate student automatically goes on probation when his/her cumulative 
average falls below "B." 

3. A student may be dropped from the degree program if he/she has not been 
removed from probation after two successive terms as a full-time student. 

4. A student may not repeat a required course in which "C" or above was earned. 

5. A student may repeat a required course in which "F" was earned. A student may 
not repeat the course more than once. If a student fails a second time, he/she is 
dismissed from the degree program. 

6. All hours attempted in graduate courses and all grade points earned are included 
in the computation of the cumulative average of a graduate student. 

7. A student who stops attending a course but fails to withdraw officially may be 
assigned a grade of "F." 

8. All grades of "I" must be removed during the student's next term of residence. 

9. A student may not count towards a degree program any course in which a grade 
of "F" was earned. 

24 



Note: The North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction does not accept 
towards renewal of certification any course in which a student has received a grade of 
"D" or "F." 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
FOR CLASS A TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

In all graduate degree programs except those leading to a Master of Science in 
Chemistry, in Biology, in Food and Nutrition, and the Master of Science in Engineer- 
ing, the student at A. & T. State University must hold a Class A certificate before be- 
ing admitted to candidacy. 

To provide the professional education component for the student who enters 
graduate studies without the required credits in courses in education and who is pur- 
suing a teaching program for the secondary school level, the following program of 24 
semester hours is offered: Education 625, Education 400 (Psychological Foundations 
of Education), Guidance 600 and the Student Teaching Block: Education 500 (Princi- 
ples and Curricula of Secondary Schools, the appropriate subject methods course, 
Education 637, and Education 560 (Observation and Student Teaching). 

Students who have earned some but not enough undergraduate credits in education 
and students without "A" certificates who are seeking graduate degrees in early 
childhood education (Kindergarten-grade 3) should consult with the chairman of the 
Department of Education or the Dean of the Graduate School to work out programs to 
meet certification requirements. 

While taking undergraduate courses in education and psychology to meet certifica- 
tion requirements, a student may enroll in graduate-level courses in his subject mat- 
ter area of concentration if he has completed the undergraduate requirements in that 



SUBJECT-MATTER REQUIREMENTS FOR 
CLASS A TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

If a student has not completed sufficient undergraduate courses in a subject-matter 
field to hold a Class A certificate in that subject, he should consult with the chairman 
of the department offering that concentration. Together, they must work out a 
program to satisfy the undergraduate deficiencies by means of undergraduate courses 
or courses open to undergraduates and graduates. 

REGULATIONS FOR A MASTER'S DEGREE 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR A DEGREE 

Admission to graduate studies does not guarantee admission to candidacy for a 
degree. In order to be qualified as a candidate for a degree, a student must have a 
minimum overall average of 3.0 in at least nine semester hours of graduate work at A. 
and T., must have removed all deficiencies resulting from undergraduate preparation, 
and must have passed the Qualifying Essay. Some departments require additional 
qualifying examinations. 

In order to be classified as a candidate for a Master of Science in Engineering 
degree, a student must have a minimum overall average of 3.0 in at least nine 
semester hours of approved graduate work at A. and T. and must have removed all 
deficiencies resulting from undergraduate preparation. 

The following is the procedure for securing admission to candidacy: 

1. The student secures application forms for admission to candidacy from the 
Graduate Office, fills them out, and returns them to that office. This step should be 
taken as soon as possible after the student has decided upon a degree program. 

25 



2. The Graduate Office processes the application, notifies the student of the action, 
and informs him/her of the time when the Qualifying Essay will next be ad- 
ministered. 

3. The student may take the Qualifying Essay during the first term of residence in 
graduate studies. If a student fails the Qualifying Essay, he/she may take it a second 
time. After a second failure the student must enroll in a prescribed English composi- 
tion course (English 300 or 621) at this university and must earn a grade of "C" or 
above. 

4. The Graduate Office informs the student of any qualifying examinations re- 
quired by the department in which he is concentrating his studies. 

5. After the student has completed at least nine semester hours of graduate study 
at the college, he/she becomes eligible for admission to candidacy. If, at that time, 
he/she has maintained an average of 3.0 in graduate studies, has passed the Qualify- 
ing Essay and all departmental qualifying examinations, the Graduate School informs 
the student that he/she has been admitted to candidacy and assigns him/her to an ad- 
viser in his/her field of concentration. 

In order to be eligible for graduation during a term, a student must have been ad- 
mitted to candidacy no less than fifteen days prior to the deadline for filing for 
graduation during that term. 

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

The minimum credit requirements for a graduate degree are thirty semester hours 
for students in thesis and non-thesis programs. It is expected that a student can com- 
plete a program by studying full-time for an academic year and one additional sum- 
mer term or by studying full-time during four nine-week summer sessions. 

The minimum credit requirements for a Master of Science in Engineering are thirty 
semester hours for students who elect to take the thesis option and thirty-three 
semester hours for students who take the non-thesis option. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of three-fourths of the hours required for the degree must be earned in 
residence study at the university. 

TIME LIMITATION 

The graduate program must be completed within six successive calendar years. Pro- 
grams remaining incomplete after this time interval are subject to cancellation, revi- 
sion, or special examination for out-dated work. 

When the program of study is interrupted because the student has been drafted into 
the armed services, the time limit shall be extended for the length of time the student 
shall have been on active duty, if the candidate resumes graduate work no later than 
one year following his/her release from military service. 

COURSE LEVELS 

At the university, six-digit numbers are used to designate all course offerings. The 
last three digits indicate the classification level of the course. Courses numbered 600 
through 699 are open to seniors and to graduate students. Courses numbered 700 
through 799 are open only to graduate students. At least fifty percent of the courses 
counted in the work towards a Master's degree must be those open only to graduate 
students; that is, numbered 700 through 799. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred from 

26 



another graduate institution if (1) the work is acceptable as credit toward a com- 
parable degree at the institution from which transfer is sought, and (2) the courses to 
be transferred are approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

To request a transfer of credit, the student must complete an application in the 
Graduate School Office. It will be the applicant's responsibility to request from the ap- 
propriate institution(s) a statement certifying that the work is acceptable as credit 
toward a comparable degree. The transcript should then be sent to the Graduate 
School Office of A. and T. State University. 

FINAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

At least 45 days before a candidate expects to complete all work for the graduate 
degree, the candidate should file in the Graduate office an application for a final ex- 
amination. 

1. All graduate students are required to pass a written comprehensive examination 
in their area of specialty. 

In the case of Engineering students, the School of Engineering will recommend to 
the graduate school whether or not this comprehensive examination will be oral 
or written. 

2. Students pursuing a degree of M.S. in Education, subject-matter oriented, will 
take a comprehensive examination in two parts, subject-matter and professional 
education. The evaluation will be made by the faculties in the respective areas. 

3. If a student fails a comprehensive examination twice, he/she must petition for a 
third examination. The petition is reviewed by a committee from the student's 
major concentration. A student who fails a third time is dismissed from the 
degree program. 

4. Comprehensive examinations are to be scheduled by the departments, with the 
approval of the Graduate Office. A report of the student's performance must be 
submitted to the Graduate Office at least three weeks prior to Commencement. 

OPTIONS FOR DEGREE PROGRAM 

The student, in consultation with his/her adviser, selects the degree program to be 
followed. The adviser must notify the chairperson of the department of the program 
plan which the candidate prefers to follow. 

Thesis Option 

In order for a student to pursue a thesis program, he/she must be recommended to 
the Dean of the Graduate School by his/her adviser and the chairperson of the depart- 
ment in which a student is concentrating his/her studies. The Graduate School must 
then approve the student as a candidate. The thesis program consists of thirty 
semester hours including the thesis. After receiving written approval to follow the 
thesis option, the candidate shall prepare and present the thesis proposal to the ad- 
viser. Upon the request of the adviser, the Dean of the Graduate School shall appoint a 
Thesis Proposal Committee and shall fix a time of meeting. Following acceptance of 
the proposal, the adviser must submit to the Dean of the Graduate School an approved 
copy of the proposal in its final form. Individuals who have been granted the privilege 
of following the thesis optin are expected to demonstrate research competencies and to 
prepare a scholarly account of resulting data. 

Non-Thesis Option 

The non-thesis plan is offered to the candidate who may benefit more from a 
broader range of studies than from the preparation of a thesis. The program of study 
must consist of a minimum of 30 credit hours of prescribed courses. 



27 



Individuals who are following this plan must demonstrate their ability to conduct 
and to report the results of original research by preparing a paper as a part of the 
course Special Problems or Research or Seminar in the appropriate area. 

Thesis Option [Master of Science in Engineering] 

In order for a student to pursue a thesis program, he/she must be recommended to 
the Dean of the Graduate School by the Dean of the School of Engineering. The 
Graduate School must then approve the student as a candidate. The thesis program 
consists of thirty semester hours including the thesis. After receiving written ap- 
proval to follow the thesis option, the candidate shall prepare and present the thesis 
proposal to the chairperson of his/her Advisory Committee. Following acceptance of 
the proposal, an approved copy of the proposal in its final form must be submitted to 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 

The Non-Thesis Option [Master of Science in Engineering] 

The non-thesis plan is offered to the candidate who may benefit more from a broad- 
er range of studies than from the preparation of a thesis. The program of study must 
consist of a minimum of 33 credit hours of prescribed courses. 

MASTER'S THESIS AND FORMAT 

The following regulations for a Master's thesis and the format of the thesis: 

1. A student writing a thesis must register for the course, Thesis, prior to the 
semester in which he/she expects to take the final examination. 

2. Three typewritten copies of the completed thesis must be submitted to the Dean 
of the Graduate School, together with two copies of an abstract of the thesis. The 
abstract should be 400 to 500 words. Consult the Graduate School's calendar for 
deadline dates regarding submission of these manuscripts. 

3. Additional information concerning the format is available in the Graduate 
School Office. 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

A candidate for graduation must file an application for graduation at least 30 days 
prior to the close of the session in which he/she expects to complete the requirements 
for the degree. A student secures the application forms from his/her advisor, who 
must approve the application before it is sent to the Graduate School Office. Failure to 
meet the deadline may result in delay of graduation for the candidate. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION 

The Graduate Record Examination is required of all students who desire to become 
candidates for the Master of Science degree. Information concerning the time, place, 
and cost of the examination may be obtained from the office of the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

SECOND MASTER'S DEGREE 

The Graduate School of North Carolina A. and T. State University provides an op- 
portunity for a student holding a Master's degree to earn a second Master's degree in 
another discipline or specialty. To be admitted for a second Master's degree, the stu- 
dent files the appropriate admission application, submits transcripts and provides 
pertinent examination scores. 

During the first semester, the student makes application for candidacy. In the last 
semester of courses, the student files for the comprehensive examination in the new 



28 



specialty. In collaboration with the advisor, the student plans the new program to in- 
clude a minimum of 18 semester hours in the new specialty to be taken in the Univer- 
sity. Twelve hours will be accepted from the first Master's providing that degree was 
completed at North Carolina A. and T. State University. If the student is a transfer 
student, twenty four hours must be completed in the new program since University 
regulations allow only six semester hours to be accepted in transfer credits. 

ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY CONCERNING CHANGES IN 

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Generally, a student is permitted to graduate according to the requirements 
specified either in the catalogue current during the year of his/her first application for 
candidacy or in the catalogue current during the year of his/her application for 
graduation. If more than six years pass between the student's application for can- 
didacy and his application for graduation, the university reserves the right to require 
the student to satisfy the regulations in effect at the time of his/her application for 
graduation. In all instances, the Graduate School reserves the right to require stu- 
dents in programs in Agricultural Education, Education, or Industrial Education to 
satisfy the requirements specified by the North Carolina Department of Public In- 
struction at the time of the Student's completion of the requirements for the Master of 
Science degree. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Diplomas are awarded only at the commencement exercises following the comple- 
tion of all requirements for the degree. Attendance at Commencement is required of 
all graduating students unless individually excused by the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS 

Additional rules, regulations, and standards for each of the areas of graduate study 
appear in the appropriate sections of the catalogue. The prospective student should 
read such sections with care. 









« 274V 



29 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

A curriculum guide for each degree program can be obtained from the Graduate 
School Office. With approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, the chairperson of a 
department in which a student is concentrating may permit a student to substitute a 
course for one listed as required. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ADULT EDUCATION 

Focus 

The general aim of the Master of Science in Adult Education program is to prepare 
present and prospective teachers of adult learners so that they will be capable of per- 
forming this role assignment. Emphasis is placed on the development of those com- 
petencies which are necessary for teaching the adult more effectively. 

Objectives 

Upon completion of the program, graduates will be expected to demonstrate these 
skills or competencies: 

1. A broad understanding of and familiarity with the general field of adult educa- 
tion, i.e., concepts, theories, and teaching methods. 

2. Ability to construct a curriculum involving the learners and relevant resources. 

3. Ability to conduct (teach) a meaningful teaching-learning experience. 

4. An understanding of an ability to evaluate a teaching-learning experience. 

5. A perception which indicates a holistic and interdisciplinary view regarding 
adult/continuing education. 

6. Capability to make a thorough assessement of the needs of adults. 

7. The ability to define and formulate behavioral learning objectives. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum for the program includes offerings at the master's degree level in 
liberal studies, general education and adult education topics. A common core of 
courses will be required of all students. The minimum credit requirements are thirty 
(30) semester hours for students taking the thesis option and thirty-three (33) 
semester hours for students taking the non-thesis option. Each graduate student will 
be required to complete a practicum in adult teaching for a minimum of two months 
for the purpose of testing his/her teaching competencies. 

Admission Requirements 

All applicants must meet those entrance requirements as set forth by the Graduate 
School. Applicants may be admitted to the program unconditionally or provisionally 
as stated below: 

1. Unconditional Admission — The applicant must have earned a bachelor's degree 
from a four-year college. The applicant's over-all average must be at least 2.6 on a 
4-point system, as earned through undergraduate studies. 

2. Provisional Admission— An applicant may be admitted provisionally under the 
following circumstances: 

(a) Having earned a baccalaureate degree from a non-accredited institution, or 

(b) Undergraduate preparation reveals deficiencies which can be removed near 
the beginning of the graduate study, or 

(c) Interest in taking courses for either self-improvement or teaching certificate 
renewal and not interested in seeking a graduate degree at NCA&TSU. If the 



30 



student subsequently desires to pursue the degree program, no more than 
twelve semester hours may be applied. 

Degree Requirements 

Total Hours Required: A minimum of 30 hours with thesis or 33 hours without 
thesis and at least a 3.0 average on a 4.0 scale. At least 50% of the courses counted 
toward the graduate degree must be of courses offered to graduate students only, i.e., 
courses numbered 700-799. 

Description Credits 

Introduction to Adult Education 3 

Methods in Adult Education 3 

Adult Development & Learning 3 

History & Philosophy of Adult/Cont. Education 3 
Organization, Administration and Supervision 

of Adult Education Programs 3 

Practicum in Teaching Adults 3 

Thesis Research (Optional) 3 

Methods and Techniques of Research 3 

Seminar in Educational Problems 3 

Adult Education in Occupational Education 3 

Teaching the Culturally Disadvantaged Learner 3 

Utilization of Educational Media 3 

Gerontology 3 

Small Groups 3 

Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult/Cont. Edu. 1 

Independent Study 2 

The Community College & Post Secondary Education 3 

Special Problems in Adult Education 1-4 

Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Essay Examination 

b. 3.0 overall grade point average for all graduate courses 

c. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Adult Education 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Agricultural Education offers programs leading to the Master of 
Science Degree. The programs are designed to meet the needs of individual students 
and emphasize the professional improvement of teachers and professional workers in 
related areas. They provide advanced preparation for employment in administration, 
supervision, teacher education, and research in agricultural education and related 
fields. 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

1. Baccalaureate degree from accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Class "A" teacher's certificate in Agricultural Education (or qualifications for 
such a certificate). 

3. Satisfactory completion of all Graduate School requirements for admission to 
candidacy for a degree. 

4. Failure to meet any of these criteria may necessitate rejection of the application 
or the requirement of additional undergraduate work. 



31 



A.E. 


651 


A.E. 


652 


A.E. 


653 


A.E. 


700 


A.E. 


701 


A.E. 


702 


A.E. 


705 


EDU 


. 710 


EDU 


. 790 


Ag. Ed. 601 


EDU 


. 641 


EDU 


. 602 (Media) 


A.E. 


654 


sss. 


669 


A.E. 


703 


A.E. 


704 


EDU 


. 690 


A.E. 


650 



General Requirements for a Degree 

A minimum of 30 semester hours are required. The degree is not conferred for a 
mere collection of credits. A well-balanced, unified, and complete program of study 
will be required. A student may meet the degree requirements by either full-time or 
part-time enrollment and by attendance in any combination of terms. 

The student may follow a thesis or non-thesis program. Those candidates who do 
not write a thesis must present a suitable essay or investigative paper. Its nature and 
extent shall be determined by the department. 

Courses in the major and minor areas will be selected on the basis of the individual's 
needs and interests. To qualify for the graduate certificate to teach in the public 
schools of North Carolina the candidate should complete 18 semester credits in subject 
matter agriculture. The candidate may concentrate in one subject matter area. 

Other Requirements 

(a) Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Educa- 
tion), (b) 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses, (c) Final Comprehensive Ex- 
amination in Agricultural Education. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY 

The Department of Biology offers two options for a Master of Science degree. One 
involves pure or professional biology as described below. The second option is biology- 
education which requires teaching credentials. This program is described later in this 
catalog. 

I. Description of the Program 

A. Master of Science Degree in Biology to be Awarded: M.S. 

B. The Program is designed primarily for qualified students who are desirous of 
working toward advanced degrees in Biology, and who aspire to careers of 
creative scholarships in science, the training pertinent to graduate studies, 
successful research in biological investigations, and other vocations in health 
related areas. 

C. This program is directly related to the professional sequence of the under- 
graduate, B.S. degree in Biology. Students who complete the professional 
tract of the Bachelor's of Science degree in Biology fulfill the requirements 
for entrance into this program. It is the second step in the logical progression 
of students who are preparing themselves for professions and/or vocations in 
the area of Biology, and the diverse health related occupations. 

D. The program provides the basic advanced training in Biology that is essential 
to graduate studies leading the the Master of Science degree in Biology. The 
objectives of the program are: 

a. The development of quality students who aspire to careers of creative 
scholarship in science 

b. The preparation of students for further graduate studies 

c. The development of students for successful research in biological in- 
vestigations 

d. The preparation of students for vocations in health related areas. 

II. Program Requirements and Curriculum 
A. Admission 

1. The admission requirements in general will be those that are presently the 
admission policies for graduate study at this University. Specifically all 
applicants for graduate study must have earned a Bachelor's Degree from 
a four year college. Application forms may be obtained from the Office of 
the Graduate School and must be returned to that office with two 



32 



transcripts of previous undergraduate and graduate studies. Processing of 
applications cannot be guaranteed unless they are received, with all sup- 
porting documents, in the Graduate Office at least fifteen days before a 
registration period. Applicants may be admitted to graduate studies un- 
conditionally, provisionally, or as special graduate students. 

a. Unconditional Admission. To qualify for unconditional admission to 
the Master of Science degree in Biology, an applicant must have earned 
an overall average of 2.6 on a 4 point system or 1.6 on a 3 point system 
in his undergraduate studies. His record must show the completion, 
with an average of "B" (3.0) or better, of an undergraduate major of at 
least 32 semester hours in the area of Biology and credit for four 
semesters of Chemistry and two semesters of Physics. To be admitted 
to the Master of Science degree in Biology, an applicant must have the 
preparation and ability which, in the judgment of the Department and 
the Graduate School, are sufficient to enable him to progress satisfac- 
torily in this degree program. 

b. Provisional Admission. In exceptional cases in which the require- 
ments for unconditional admission are not met, or if the undergradu- 
ate preparation is inadequate, an applicant, if considered to have a 
reasonable probability of making satisfactory progress in graduate 
Biology, may be admitted provisionally. For provisional admission, an 
applicant may be admitted to graduate study in Biology on a provi- 
sional basis if: (1) he earned the Baccalaureate degree from a non- 
accredited institution or (2) the record of his undergraduate prepara- 
tion reveals deficiencies that can be removed near the beginning of his 
graduate studies. A student admitted provisionally may be required to 
pass an examination to demonstrate his knowledge in Biology, to take 
special undergraduate courses to improve his background, or to 
demonstrate his competence for graduate studies in Biology by earning 
no grades below "B" in his first nine hours of graduate studies at this 
Institution. 

c. Special Graduate Students. Applicants not seeking a graduate degree 
may be admitted to pursue courses in this program for self- 
improvement such as becoming more knowledgeable of biological infor- 
mation relative to career occupations in biological and/or health 
related professions. 

Degree Requirement 

1. There will be a requirement of thirty semester hours for the completion of 
the Master of Science degree in Biology. 

2. Approximately one half of the courses offered in this program will be 
designated as courses open only to graduate students. 

3. A student must have a cumulative average of "B" (a grade point average of 
3.0 on a system in which one hour of "A" earns 4 grade points). 

4. A maximum of six semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred 
from another graduate institution if: (1) the work is acceptable as credit 
toward a comparable degree at the institution from which transfer is 
sought, and (2) the courses to be transferred are approved by the Dean of 
the Graduate School. 

5. The minimum residence requirement is one academic year or 36 weeks of 
attendance. A student who does not complete his degree within six suc- 
cessive calendar years may lose credit for hours earned more than six 
years prior to his application for graduation. 

A reading knowledge of one foreign language will be required for the 
Master of Science degree in Biology. This requirement must be satisfied 



33 



prior to admission to candidacy for the degree. The examination of the stu- 
dent for his foreign language requirement will be administered by the per- 
tinent language department. 

6. Students who are candidates for the Master's degree will be required to 
pass two comprehensive examinations. One of these is a "comprehensive 
writing examination" covering the courses within the biological sphere of 
this program. The other comprehensive examination will be the "oral ex- 
amination" covering the thesis. A committee consisting of examiners 
representing the major and minor areas of the candidates' subject matter 
concentration will administer this examination. 

7. This program must be completed within six successive calendar years. 
When, however, the program is interrupted by the student's being draft- 
ed into the armed services, the time limit shall be extended for the length 
of time the student shall have been on active duty, if the candidate 
resumes graduate work no later than one year following his/her release 
from military service. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry offers the Master of Science degree in Chemistry. In 
addition to this program, the department provides instruction for those graduate stu- 
dents who wish to pursue a curriculum that can lead to a degree in Education with 
specialization in Chemistry. Individuals who desire to renew teaching certificates in 
the field may also enroll in certain courses in the department for this purpose. 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Undergraduate major in Chemistry including one year of undergraduate Physi- 
cal Chemistry and one year of Integral and Differential Calculus. 

3. Satisfactory completion of all Graduate School requirements for admission to 
candidacy for a degree. 

4. Any student, who is a rising junior in Chemistry, with a grade-point average of 
3.0 in Chemistry and an overall grade-point average of 2.7. 

Failure to meet any of these criteria may necessitate rejection of the application 
or the requirement of additional undergraduate work. 

General Requirements for a Degree, 30 Semester Hours, Including Thesis 

1. Required Courses 

Chemistry 611 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
Chemistry 722 — Advanced Organic Chemistry 
Chemistry 743 — Chemical Thermodynamics 
Chemistry 701 — Seminar 

Chemistry 732 — Advanced Analytical Chemistry 
Chemistry 799 — Thesis Research 
Chemistry 702 — Chemical Research 
(A maximum of 9 hrs. may be earned in 702) 

2. Other Requirements 

a. 2-9 s.h. in electives 

b. GRE (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Chemistry). Scores must be sub- 
mitted to the Graduate School Office before admission to the final examina- 
tion can be granted. 

c. Satisfactory completion of an examination in German. 

d. Satisfactory presentation and defense of a thesis. 

e. One academic year of residence at A. and T. 

34 



f. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses. 

g. Final comprehensive examination in Chemistry, 
h. Participation in seminar while in residence. 

Candidates for the Master of Science in Chemistry who desire to teach in the public 
schools of North Carolina on a graduate certificate should study the course and ex- 
amination requirements described for candidates for an M.S. in Education with con- 
centration in Chemistry. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN EDUCATION 

The School of Education offers the Master of Science in Education. This program is 
desigped for the individual who wishes to seek a graduate certificate to teach or to 
serve in an administrative capacity in the public schools of North Carolina. 

Areas of concentration included in this degree program are: 1) Educational media, 
2) Elementary Education, 3) Administration, 4) Guidance, 5) Secondary Education, 6) 
Supervision, 7) Reading, 8) Safety and Driver Education. 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

1. Baccalaureate degree from accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Class A certificate in area of concentration. 

3. Satisfactory completion of all Graduate School requirements for admission to 
candidacy for a degree. 

Educational Media— 30 s.h. required 

A. Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

1. 3 s.h. in Curriculum and 3 s.h. in Historical and Philosophical Foundations of 
Education. 

2. Education 642, 644— 6 s.h. 

3. 12 s.h. from the following in consultation with adviser: Education 611, 612, 624, 
645, 650, 651, 734, 735, 736, 738. 

B. Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required 

1. 3 s.h. in Curriculum and 3 s.h. in Historical Foundations of Education. 

2. Education 642, 644—6 s.h. 

3. 12 s.h. from the following in consultation with adviser: Education 611, 612, 624, 
645, 650, 651, 734, 735, 736, 738. 

C. Other Requirements 

1. Master's Comprehensive in Education 

2. Master's Comprehensive in Educational Media 

DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, AND 
POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION 






S. Joseph Shaw, Acting Chairperson 



Objectives 

The objectives of the Department of Administration, Supervision, and Postsecond- 
ary Education are to offer graduate level programs of preparation in educational ad- 
ministration and supervision and postsecondary education. The masters degree pro- 
grams in administration and supervision are consistent with State-adopted 
competency-based guidelines and lead to North Carolina certification at the Adminis- 
trator I and Curriculum-Instructional Specialist I levels. The Department also offers 
programs of certification for those students who already hold a masters degree in 
Education with certification in other professional areas. The graduate program is 
designed to prepare students for positions in administration, supervision, and 
teaching primarily at the community college and technical institute levels. 

35 



Degrees Offered 

Master of Science in Education — Administration 
Master of Science in Education — Supervision 

General Program Requirements 

Requirements for admission to degree programs in the School of Education are as 
follows: 

1. Baccalaureate degree from accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Class A certificate in area of concentration. 

3. Satisfactory completion of all Graduate School requirements for admission to 
candidacy for a degree. 

Under policies of the Graduate School, candidacy for a degree requires the follow- 
ing: 

1. The Qualifying Essay. 

2. The Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude and Advanced Test in Education) 

3. The Masters Comprehensive in Education and in either Administration or Super- 
vision. 

4. An overall grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate level courses. 

Departmental Requirements 

The major in Administration must complete 30 semester hours of University 
courses for a graduate degree and at least 12 semester hours for certification only. An 
overall grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained for the degree or for certifica- 
tion. 

A Curriculum Instructional Specialist major must complete from 30-33 semester 
hours for a graduate degree (30 for those completing work for the supervisor's pro- 
gram at the Early Childhood level and the Intermediate Education Level). An overall 
grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained. 

Accreditation 

The graduate degree programs in administration and supervision are approved by 
the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction. 

Career Opportunities 

Graduate degree and certification programs qualify the student for the principal- 
ship and/or supervisory positions at the elementary and secondary school levels. The 
program in postsecondary education is designed to meet the need for administrative, 
supervisory, and teaching personnel at the community college and technical institute 
levels. 

Curriculum Guide 

Administration: 30 S.H. Required 

This program is designed for students who are interested in qualifying for State 
Certification as Administrator I (the principal's certification). Completion of this pro- 
gram does not qualify one for the graduate teaching certificate. 

Students pursuing certification, but not the masters degree are required to complete 
at least 12 semester hours at this University. 

Education 761, School Organization and Administration, is a prerequisite for all 
other professional courses in the specific areas of organization and administration, 
curriculum, instruction, and supervision (items lb and lc in the requirements out- 
lined below). 

36 



1. Courses 

a. Foundations in Education — 3 hours 
Psy. 726— Educational Psychology 

or 
Ed. 701— Philosophy of Education 

b. Organization and Administration — 6 hours selected from: 
Ed. 760— The Junior High School 

Ed. 761— Organization and Administration of Schools 
Ed. 762— The Principalship 

c. Curriculum, Instruction and Supervision — 6 hours selected from: 
Ed. 720 — Curriculum Development 

Ed. 755— Supervision of Instruction 

Ed. 756 — Supervision of Student Teachers 

d. Cognate Disciplines — 6 hours selected from: 
Economics 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Anthropology 

e. Internship — Administrative Field Experience — 3 hours 

Ed. 769 — Problems in Educational Administration and Supervision 

f. Electives— 6 hours 

2. Other Requirements 

a. GRE (Aptitude and Advanced Test in Education) 

b. Master's Comprehensive in Education and in Administration 

c. Overall grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate courses 

Curriculum Instructional Specialist: 30-33 S.H. Required 

For the Curriculum Instructional Specialist's I (Master's Degree) certificate, the 
State of North Carolina requires five years of teaching and/or supervisory or ad- 
ministrative experience within the past eight years. A student will not be recom- 
mended for the North Carolina Curriculum Instructional Specialist's certificate 
without the minimum five years of experience specified above. 

A. Requirements for Unconditional Admission 

1. Baccalaureate degree from accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Overall average of 2.6 in undergraduate studies. 

3. Class A Certificate (or qualifications for such a certificate). 

4. Failure to meet any of these criteria may cause rejection of the application or 
may require additional undergraduate work to satisfy the requirements. 

R. Courses in Education and Psychology — 15 semester hours 

1. Supervision — 3 hours required 
Education 755 — Supervision of Instruction 

Education 757— Problems in Supervision of the Elementary School 
Education 758 — Problems in High School Supervision 

2. Curriculum — 3 hours required 
Education 720— Curriculum Development 
Education 721— Curriculum in the Elementary School 
Education 722 — Curriculum in the Secondary School 

3. The Nature of Learning and the Learning Process— 3 hours required 
Psychology 635— Educational Psychology and Learning 
Psychology 726— Educational Psychology 

Psychology 727— Child Growth and Development 

4. Organization and Administration— 3 hours required 
Education 761 — School Organization and Administration 

5. Educational Research — 3 hours required 



37 



Education 790 — Seminar in Educational Problems 

C. Required Courses in Subject Matter to qualify for issuance of the graduate 
teacher's certificate — early childhood or intermediate, or secondary — 12-18 
semester hours. 

D. Electives — If 12 semester hours credit are used to satisfy C, 3 hours may be used as 
electives to meet the particular needs of the students. 

E. Other requirements 

1. Qualifying Examination 

2. Graduate Record Examination 

3. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

4. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Supervision 

5. Overall grade point average of 3.0 for all courses 

Total Number of Hours Required — 30-33 (30 for those completing work for the super- 
visor's program at the Early Childhood Education level and the Intermediate Educa- 
tion level). 

Elementary Education Curriculum (General): 30 S.H. Required 

A. Non-Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

a. Research—Education 311-790 

b. Nine hours from the following areas appropriate to early childhood educa- 
tion 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process: Psychology 320- 
726, Psychology 320-727 

(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education: Education 310-781 

(3) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education: 
Education 311-625, Education 311-626, Education 311-701, Education 
311-703 

(4) Curriculum: Education 310-683, Education 311-720, Education 310-721 

c. Eighteen hours taken from English, fine arts (art and music), health and 
physical education, mathematics, science and social science 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude and Advanced Test in Education) 

c. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Final comprehensive examination in education 

B. Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

a. Research: Education 311-791 

b. Nine hours from the following areas appropriate to early childhood educa- 
tion 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process: Psychology 320-726, 
Psychology 320-727 

(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education: Education 310-781 

(3) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education: 
Education 311-625, Education 311-626, Education 311-701, Education 311- 
703 

(4) Curriculum: Education 310-683, Education 311-720, Education 310-721 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Eighteen hours in no more than two of the academic disciplines specified in 
the description of the non-thesis program 

b. Qualifying Examination 

c. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Educa- 
tion) 

38 



d. Comprehensive Examination in Elementary Education 

e. Thesis Examination 

Early Childhood Education Curriculum (Grades K-3): 30 S.H. Required 

A. Non-Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

a. Research— Education 311-790 

b. Nine hours from the following areas appropriate to early childhood educa- 
tion 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process: Psychology 320- 
726, Psychology 320-727 

(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education: Education 310-781 

(3) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education: 
Education 311-625, Education 311-626, Education 311-701, Education 
311-703 

(4) Curriculum: Education 310-683, Education 311-720, Education 310-721 

c. Nine hours taken from English, fine arts (art and music), health and physical 
education, mathematics, science and social science 

d. Nine hours of electives 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude and Advanced Test in Education) 

c. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Final comprehensive examination in education 

B. Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

a. Research: Education 311-791 

b. Nine hours from the following areas appropriate to early childhood educa- 
tion 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process: Psychology 320-726, 
Psychology 320-727 

(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education: Education 310-781 

(3) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education: 
Education 311-625, Education 311-626, Education 311-701, Education 311- 
703 

(4) Curriculum: Education 310-683, Education 311-720, Education 310-721 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Eighteen hours in no more than two of the academic disciplines specified in 
the description of the non-thesis program 

b. Qualifying Examination 

c. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Educa- 
tion) 

d. Comprehensive Examination in Elementary Education 

e. Thesis Examination 

Intermediate Education Curriculum (Grades 4-8): 30 S.H. Required 

A. Non-Thesis Option 
1. Courses Required 

a. Research— Education 311-790 

b. Nine hours from the following areas appropriate to early childhood educa- 
tion 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process: Psychology 320- 
726, Psychology 320-727 



39 



(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education: Education 310-781 

(3) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education: 
Education 311-625, Education 311-626, Education 311-701, Education 
311-703 

(4) Curriculum: Education 311-720, Education 310-721 

c. Eighteen hours taken from English, fine arts (art and music), health and 
physical education, mathematics, science and social science 
2. Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude and Advanced Test in Education) 

c. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Final comprehensive examination in education 
B. Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

a. Research: Education 311-791 

b. Nine hours from the following areas appropriate to early childhood educa- 
tion 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process: Psychology 320-726, 
Psychology 320-727 

(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education: Education 310-781 

(3) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education: 
Education 311-625, Education 311-626, Education 311-701, Education 311- 
703 

(4) Curriculum: Education 311-720, Education 310-721 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Eighteen hours in no more than two of the academic disciplines specified in 
the description of the non-thesis program 

b. Qualifying Examination 

c. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Educa- 
tion) 

d. Comprehensive Examination in Elementary Education 

e. Thesis Examination 

Counselor-Education (Guidance) Curriculum: 31 S.H. Required 

The Master of Science degree program in Educational Psychology and Guidance is 
designed to prepare individuals for Counselor's Certification and/or Non-Certification 
at the Master's Level. Three areas of concentration are offered: 1) Counseling in 
schools, kindergarten through 12th grade, 2) Counseling in community and agency set- 
tings, 3) Counseling in manpower governmental units, local, state and national level. 
While the inter-relatedness of these program areas necessitate a common core of 
courses, there is sufficient uniqueness in the expected competencies to require some 
differentiation of sources and experiences. The prerequisites for admission to the pro- 
gram are: 1) Introduction to Guidance and/or its equivalency, and 2) a course in 
Educational Statistics or Psychological Measurement. 

1. The Professional Core for all three tracks requires the following: 

Required Courses S.H. 

Education 701 Philosophy of Education 3 

Education 720 Curriculum Development 3 

or 
Education 722 Curriculum in the Secondary School 3 

Guidance 623 Personality Development 3 



40 



Guidance 706 Organization and Administration of Guidance 

Services 3 

Guidance 716 Techniques of Individual Analysis 3 

Guidance 717 Educational and Occupational Information 3 

Guidance 718 Introduction to Counseling 3 

Guidance 720 Principles and Dynamics of Group Counseling 3 

Guidance 726 Educational Psychology 3 

Guidance 730 (705) Guidance Practicum 3 

Addition of courses to the Department: 

Guidance 722 Career Education and Vocational Development 

Theories 3 

Guidance 723 Student Personnel Services in Post-Secondary 

Education 3 

Guidance 724 Advanced Counseling Theories, Strategies 

i and Techniques 3 

Courses in Adult Education, Anthropology, Economics, Political 

Science and Sociology 6 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude and Advanced Test in Education). 

b. 3.0 grade point average or better for graduate courses. 

c. Final comprehensive examination in Guidance and in Education. 

Reading Education Curriculum: 30 S.H. Required 

The Reading Education Curriculum has two distinct approaches to certification, 
namely Option I and Option II. Option I is for those students who wish to complete 
Class A or graduate level certification, while Option II is for those students desiring to 
complete a degree program in Reading. 

A. Option I: Requires 18 semester hours from the following. 

Reading— 15 semester hours 

310-630 Foundations in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-635 Reading Through the Primary Years 3 s.h. 

310-636 Reading in the Elementary Grades 3 s.h. 

310-638 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-639 Reading Practicum 3 s.h. 

310-637 Reading in the Secondary School 3 s.h. 

310-739 Reading in the Content Areas 3 s.h. 

310-640 Reading for the Atypical Learner 3 s.h. 

The following courses shown in the list above are required for State Certification 
in Reading, Class A or G: Education 630, 635 or 636 or 637, 638, 739. 

Cognate Areas — 3 semester hours 

350-706 Media in Special Education and Reading 3 s.h. 

212-626 Children's Literature 3 s.h. 

212-710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 3 s.h. 

212-754 History and Structure of the English Language 3 s.h. 

Other Requirements 
Overall grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate courses 
Comprehensive Examination 

B. Option II: A total of 30 semester hours are required. This program leads to the 
Master of Science in Reading 



41 



Reading — 18 semester hours 

310-630 Foundations in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-635 Reading Through the Primary Years 3 s.h. 

310-636 Reading in the Elementary Grades 3 s.h. 

310-638 Diagnosis in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-640 Reading for the Atypical Learner 3 s.h. 

310-739 Reading in the Content Areas 3 s.h. 

310-741 Advanced Diagnosis 3 s.h. 

310-742 Organization and Administration of Reading Program 3 s.h. 

310-743 Advanced Practicum 3 s.h. 

310-744 Seminar and Research in Reading 3 s.h. 

Foundations of Education Courses — 3 semester hours required 

311-626 History of American Education 3 s.h. 

31 1-701 Philosophy of Education (or) 3 s.h. 

311-703 Educational Sociology 3 s.h. 

311-625 Theory of American Public Education 3 s.h. 

320-726 Educational Psychology (or) 3 s.h. 

320-727 Child Growth and Development 3 s.h. 

Curriculum in Education — 3 semester hours required 

310-683 Curriculum in Early Childhood 3 s.h. 

310-721 Curriculum in the Elementary School (or) 3 s.h. 

311-720 Curriculum Development (or) 3 s.h. 

311-722 Curriculum in the Secondary School 3 s.h. 

Cognate Areas— 6 semester hours required 

350-706 Media in Special Education and Reading 3 s.h. 

212-626 Children's Literature 3 s.h. 

212-710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 3 s.h. 

212-754 History and Structure of the English Language 3 s.h. 

If a student has already earned 18 semester hours in Reading at the Class A or 
graduate level for state certification purposes then he/she may elect additional 
hours necessary to complete requirements from the following courses with 
academic advisement. 

Required Reading Courses for the M.S. Degree in Reading 

310-630 Foundations in Reading (or) 3 s.h. 

310-740 Problems in the Improvement of Reading 3 s.h. 

310-635 Reading Through the Primary Years (or) 3 s.h. 

310-636 Reading in the Elementary Grades (or) 3 s.h. 

310-637 Reading in the Secondary School 3 s.h. 

310-734 Advanced Practicum in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-638 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading (or) 3 s.h. 

310-741 Advanced Diagnosis in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-742 Organization and Administration of Reading Program 3 s.h. 

310-744 Seminar and Research in Reading 3 s.h. 

Cognate Areas 

350-706 Media in Special Education and Reading 3 s.h. 

212-710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 3 s.h. 

212-754 History and Structure of the English Language 3 s.h. 

Safety and Driver Education: 30 S.H. Required 

The program of Safety and Driver Education prepares qualified individuals for 



42 



careers as safety and driver education teachers, school district safety supervisors, pro- 
fessional personnel for leadership roles at state and federal levels. 

1. Required Courses 

a. Six hours from the following areas in Education 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process 

(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education 

(3) Historical, Philosophical, and Sociological Foundations of Education 

(4) Curriculum, Supervision, etc. 

b. Eighteen hours in Safety and Driver Education 
(SDE 653, 756, and 757 are required courses) 

c. Three hours of electives 

d. Thesis (optional) 

2. Other Requirements 

a. A minimum of 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

b. Final comprehensive examination in Education and Safety and Driver Edu- 
cation. 

c. Qualifying Examination 

Secondary Education Curriculum: 30 S.H. Required 

Candidates following the secondary education program must select one of the 
following academic areas of concentration: (1) Art, (2) Biology, (3) Chemistry, (4) 
English, (5) French, (6) Health and Physical Education, (7) Mathematics, (8) History, 
(9) Science, or (10) Social Science. 

1. Courses 

a. Non-thesis Option: 6 hours from the following areas: 

(1) Research 

(2) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process 

(3) Current Critical Issues in American Education 

(4) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education 

(5) Curriculum, Supervision, etc. 

b. Thesis Option: 6 hours from the following areas: 

(1) Research 

(2) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process 

(3) Current Critical Issues in American Education 

(4) Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education 

(5) Curriculum, Supervision, etc. 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Students in a non-thesis program may take either Education 799 (Seminar) or 
a seminar in the area of concentration. Students in a thesis program may take 
Education 791 (Thesis) or a thesis research course offered in the area of con- 
centration. In all instances, the decision is to be made in consultation with the 
adviser. 

b. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in area of 
concentration). 

c. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Final comprehensive examination in Education and area of concentration. 
For details of the specific requirements in each area of concentration, see the descrip- 
tive material for the department offering the concentration. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING 

The School of Engineering, through its graduate division, offers a program of ad- 
vanced study leading to the degree of Master of Science in Engineering. Formal in- 
struction is offered in several areas of engineering such as electrical systems, 
engineering mechanics, industrial operations, mechanical systems, structural 

43 



engineering, and structural mechanics. However, the instructional areas are not 
limited to the abovementioned areas. The programs reflect interdisciplinary emphases 
and are coordinated by the student's Advisory Committee in such a way as to meet the 
professional needs and experiences of the individual candidate. 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

1. Applicants must be accepted into the Graduate School, and approval of qualifica- 
tions must be made by the Dean of the School of Engineering. 

2. Successful completion of a program which is to be worked out by the student's Ad- 
visory Committee and approved by the Engineering Graduate Committee. At least 
20 semester hours must be in engineering courses. Elective courses may be select- 
ed from mathematics, chemistry, or other appropriate disciplines. 

3. Completing a minimum of 30 semester hours including a thesis of 6 semester hours, 
or completing a minimum of 33 semester hours. 

4. B Average in course work. 

5. Passing a final comprehensive examination. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

The Department of Home Economics offers the Master of Science in Food and 
Nutrition. This program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours and has two op- 
tions, Option A and B. 

Option A is designed to prepare students for the advanced degree in Food and Nutri- 
tion and related areas, and careers in food research, nutrition, food testing, food dem- 
onstrating, clinical nutrition, dietetics, extension service and teaching. For admission 
to this program, applicants should have majored in one or more of the following areas: 
basic food, nutrition (human or animal), biochemistry, mathematics, biology, and 
physiology. 

Option B is designed to prepare students for careers in applied nutrition. This pro- 
gram has two options, thesis and non-thesis. Students with a major interest in 
dietetics, public service careers, anthropology, sociology, economics, education and 
teaching at any level from the kindergarten to the college may enter into the program. 
Option B has the flexibility for students to write a thesis or to choose extra course 
work. Both opportunities have meaningful value in relation to students' interests, 
specialization, and career goals. 

OPTION A— M.S. in Food and Nutrition (Thesis program)— 
30 Semester hours 

All credentials of the students are subject to evaluation of the Graduate Faculty of 
the Department of Home Economics at least four weeks prior to admission. 

A. Requirements for Admission 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Overall average of 2.6 in undergraduate studies. 

B. General Departmental Requirements 

1. The undergraduate program should have included one year of each of the follow- 
ing: general chemistry and organic chemistry. 

2. Qualified applicants should have had at least one course in each of the following 
areas: quantitative analysis, biochemistry, basic nutrition, diet therapy, and 
food science (experimental cookery). 

3. Failure to meet any of the above requirements may necessitate taking of under- 
graduate courses to meet deficiencies. 

4. Admission to candidacy for the M.S. in Food and Nutrition requires the satisfac- 
tory completion of a qualifying examination in Food and Nutrition. This ex- 



44 



amination is in addition to the qualifying essay required by the Graduate 
School. (To be taken prior to the close of the first semester of the student's en- 
trance to the program). 

C. The Core Courses for Option A (Thesis) 

A total of 17 semester hours to be selected from Food and Nutrition courses in- 
cluding: 
Home Economics 730— Nutrition in Health and Disease (prerequisite Home 

Economics 630— Advance Nutrition or equivalent) 
Home Economics 735 — Experimental Food Science (prerequisite 436 — Introduc- 
tion to Food Science or equivalent) 
Home Economics 736— Research Methods in Food and Nutrition (prerequisite 

635 — Introduction to Research Methods) 
* Special Note: Prerequisite courses will not count in the 30 minimum required 

hours. 
Related Courses 
Four credit hours should be selected in any related area of food and nutrition 
courses above 700 level, (ex. 734, 744, 733) 

D. Electives 10 Semester Hours 
To be selected across interdisciplinary areas, in consultation and with written ap- 
proval of the advisor. 

Suggested electives in the following courses: 

1. 651 — Biochemistry 5 credits 

2. 629— Applied Statistics 3 credits 

3. 642— Methods of Radioisotope Techniques 3 credits 

4. 665 — Histochemical Technique or any other or equivalent course 3 credits 

5. 650 — Experimental Psychology 3 credits 

6. 690 — Special Problems in Poultry 3 credits 

7. 690 — Selection of Meat and Meat Products 3 credits 

8. 703 — Advanced Livestock Production 3 credits 

One free elective 

E. Thesis 3 Semester Hours 

F. Other Requirements 

a. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test) 

b. Final comprehensive examination in Food and Nutrition — It can be taken only 
if a student has maintained a 3.0 grade point average in the Graduate courses 
and work at the 600 level or above, and has completed the Departmental 
Qualifying Examination and Qualifying Essay Examination. 

c. 3.0 grade point average overall for all graduate courses. 

d. Satisfactory presentation and defense of thesis (if thesis is presented.) 

OPTION B— Master of Science in Food and Nutrition (concentration in Ap- 
plied Nutrition). Thesis and non-thesis programs. 
Minimum 30 semester hours 

All credentials of the students are subject to evaluation of the Graduate Faculty of 
the Department of Home Economics at least four weeks prior to admission. 

A. Requirements for Admission 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Overall average of 2.6 in undergraduate studies. 

B. General Departmental Requirements 

1. All students who have not had any courses in Food and Nutrition must take 
Home Economics 537, Review of Scientific Principles in Food and Nutrition. 
This course will count as a prerequisite to Option B in such cases, and will be in 
addition to the 30 semester hours and may not serve as an elective. 



45 



2. Both thesis and non-thesis program applicants may be requested to take a 
Diagnostic Test in Food and Nutrition to evaluate their strengths and weak- 
nesses. This test must be taken prior to registration. 

3. The non-thesis program may require more course work. The advisor should be 
consulted. 

4. Non-thesis programs must include Home Economics 745, Practicum in Food or 
Nutrition. 

5. Electives — 9 hours 

To be selected across the interdisciplinary areas, in consultation and with writ- 
ten approval of the advisor. 

6. Admission to candidacy for the M.S. in Food and Nutrition requires the satifac- 
tory completion of a qualifying examination in Food and Nutrition. This ex- 
amination is in addition to the qualifying essay required by the Graduate 
School. (To be taken prior to the close of the first semester of the student's en- 
trance to the program). 

C. The Core Courses for Option B (Thesis and Non-Thesis) 

Home Economics 736 — Research Methods in Food and Nutrition, or its equiva- 
lent, Sociology 671, Advanced Research Methods (pre- 
requisite—Math 624). 

4 Semester Hours 
Home Economics 740 — Community Nutrition 3 Semester Hours 

Home Economics 741— Cultural and Social Aspects of Food 3 Semester Hours 

* Special Note: Prerequisite courses will not be counted in the minimum 30 re- 
quired hours. 

D. Thesis Option 

Core Courses (see Section "C" above) 10 Semester Hours 

Thesis 3 Semester Hours 

Electives 9 Semester Hours 

To be selected to support the area of specialization. Electives should be 600 and 

above level courses selected from the following suggested disciplines: 

1. Computer Science 

2. Home Economics Education 

3. Journalism 

4. Child Development 

5. Psychology 

6. Agricultural Education 

7. Sociology 

Food and Nutrition 8 Semester Hours 

To be selected from following courses 

1. Home Economics 734 

2. Home Economics 733 

3. Home Economics 744 

4. Home Economics 738 

5. Home Economics 741 

E. Non-Thesis Option 

Core Courses 10 Semester Hours 

See Section "C" above 
Home Economics 745 3 Semester Hours 

Electives 9 Semester Hours 

To be selected to support the area of specialization. Electives should be 600 and 
above level courses selected from the following suggested disciplines. 

1. Computer Science 

2. Home Economics Education 

3. Journalism 

4. Child Development 

46 



5. Psychology 

6. Agricultural Education 

7. Sociology 

Food and Nutrition 14 Semester Hours 

To be selected from following courses 

1. Home Economics 734 

2. Home Economics 733 

3. Home Economics 744 

4. Home Economics 738 

5. Home Economics 741 

6. Home Economics 730 without lab 

7. Home Economics 735 without lab 
F. Other requirements 

a. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test) 

b. Final comprehensive examination in Food and Nutrition — It can be taken only 
if a student has maintained a 3.0 grade point average in the Graduate courses 
and work at the 600-level or above, and has completed the Departmental 
Qualifying examination and the Qualifying Essay Examination. 

c. 3.0 grade point average overall for all graduate courses. 

d. Satisfactory presentation and defense of thesis (if thesis is presented). 

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Industrial Education offers the Masters Degree in Industrial 
Education to persons desiring graduate level certification in teaching, supervision, 
and administration of industrial subjects in secondary and postsecondary schools. 
Areas of concentration in this program are: (1) Industrial Arts teaching; including 
middle grades occupational exploration; (3) Trade and Industrial teaching; including 
industrial cooperative education, and administration and supervision of industrial and 
technical education. 

Persons in postsecondary and in the private sector of vocational and technical edu- 
cation desiring to pursue a master's degree in Industrial Education, who do not hold a 
class "A" certificate in Industrial Arts or Trade and Industrial Education are en- 
couraged to consider a major in Postsecondary Education (Teaching or Administra- 
tion) with a 15 semester hour subject matter concentration in Industrial Education. 

Requirements for Admission To a Degree Program 

1. Baccalaureate degree from accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Class A certificate in Industrial Arts or Vocational-Occupational Education. 

3. Satisfactory completion of all Graduate School requirements for admission to can- 
didacy for a degree. 

4. Failure to meet any of these criteria may necessitate rejection of the application or 
the requirement of additional undergraduate work. 

General Requirements for a Degree: 30 Semester Hours 

1. Required Courses: Industrial Arts or Trade and Industrial Education: 15 s.h. 
Research, Ed. 710; IE 767; PE 785 S.H. 
Curriculum, Ed. 720, 722; IE 662, 766 3 
Evaluation in Industrial Education, IE 765 3 
Research Seminar or Thesis, Ed. 790, Ed. 791; IE 768, IE 769 3 
Education or Psychology, Ed. 625, 660, 701, 703; Psy. 661, 726, 727 3 

2. Industrial Education Options: 12 s.h. 
a. Option I. Industrial Arts Education 

Ind. Ed. 616, 617, 618, 619, 620, 635, 664, 715, 717. 718, 719, 731, 762; 

47 



Ind. Tech. 651, 673, 735; Guid 717 12 

b. Option II. Trade and Industrial Education 
Ind. Ed. 660, 661, 663, 762, 763, 764; 

Ed. 602, 603, 605, 700, 690, 776, 778, 779 12 

ECON 602, 604 3 

3. Electives 

4. Other Requirements 

a. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Education). 

b. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses. 

c. Final comprehensive examination in Industrial Education. 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION AND 

POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION 

S. Joseph Shaw, Acting Chairperson 

Office: 112 Hodgin Hall 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

312-690. The Community College and Postsecondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Philosophy, organization and character of school programs needed to meet educa- 
tional needs of individuals who desire to continue their education on the postsecond- 
ary level. Special attention is given to the trends in developing community colleges. 
Prerequisites: Education 727, or a graduate course in high school curriculum, Psy- 
chology 726, or graduate course in educational psychology, or three or more years of 
teaching experience. 

Graduate Courses 
3 12-755. Supervision of Instruction Credit 3(3-0) 

Modern concepts and techniques of supervision; the roles of the supervisor, prin- 
cipal, and consultant in curriculum development; and the procedures, problems, and 
materials of supervising and improving instruction in grades 1-12. 

3 12-756. Supervision of Student Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

A basic professional course for classroom teachers, principals, and supervisors who 
serve in an official capacity directing the field-laboratory experiences of student 
teachers. 

312-757. Problems in Supervision of the Elementary School Credit 3(3-0) 

The nature, theory, and practice of supervision, and the supervisor's role in im- 
provement of instruction. 

312-758. Problems in High School Supervision Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of problems, techniques, and materials in the improvement of instruction 
in secondary schools. A course for principals, heads of departments, and supervisors. 

3 1 2-760. The Junior High School Credit 3(3-0) 

The philosophy, organization, administration, curriculum and activities of the 
junior high school. 

3 12-76 1 . School Organization and Administration Credit 4(4-0) 

A comprehensive course in organization and administration of schools, grades K-12, 

placing primary emphasis on the following areas: (1) formal and informal 

organizational structure, concepts and practices; (2) the management processes; (3) 

48 



the administrative functions, with particular reference to personnel, program, and 
fiscal management; and, (4) leadership styles and the leadership role, with special at- 
tention to planning, decision-making, and conflict-resolution. 

312-762. The Principalship Credit 3(3-0) 

A professional education course for the principalship; examines the role of the prin- 
cipal in the modern school system with emphasis on planning, programming, and 
management functions. 

312-763. Public School Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of school administration, the organization and structure of the school 
system; agencies of administration and control, legal basis of school administration, 
standards for administration in the various functional areas. 

312-764. Pupil Personnel Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Pupil accounting, records and reports, financial reports, school census, special 
school reports, pupil adjustment and progress, health and safety, and legal aspects of 
pupil administration. 

3 12-765. School Publicity and Public Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the interrelationships between the lay community and the schools. Ap- 
praisal and procedures, actual or proposed, for improvement of the relationships. 

312-766. School Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the principles governing the selection and landscaping of school 
grounds, location and design of buildings, and care of plant from standpoint of use, 
sanitation, health and attractiveness. 

312-767. Public School Finance Credit 3(3-0) 

A current study of the political, legal, and economic aspects of financing public edu- 
cation, with particular attention to school finance in North Carolina. Major areas in- 
clude: (1) public education and the national economy; (2) the tax structure and sources 
of revenue, (3) resource allocation and methods of funding; (4) school finance reform; 
(5) school finance in North Carolina; and, (6) practical experience in budget planning 
and development. 

3 12-768. Principles of School Law Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the legal aspects of public education. Constitutional, statutory, and 
case law, with special attention to North Carolina law, provide the basis for under- 
standing the legal framework and examining legal principles pertaining to such areas 
as: (1) church-state-education relations; (2) race-state-education relations; (3) school 
districts; (4) school boards; (5) finance; (6) curriculum; (7) property; (8) teacher person- 
nel; and, (9) pupil personnel. 

312-769. Problems in Educational Administration and 

Supervision Credit 3(3-0) 

An internship of field study on a supervised project arising out of the needs of the 
student. Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours, including Organization and Administra- 
tion, Supervision, and Curriculum. 

312-776. Principles of College Teaching Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles involved in teaching at the college level; techniques of teaching aids, 
criteria used in evaluation. Prerequisite: Psychology 726, or graduate course in educa- 
tional psychology. 



49 



312-777. Seminar in Postsecondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A synthesis of current research in postsecondary education relating to administra- 
tion, curriculum, and faculty development. Prerequisite: Education 690. 

312-778. Student Personnel Services Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of student development programs in postsecondary institutions, including 
pre-admission, educational, vocational, and personal counseling; career guidance ser- 
vices, attitude and interest assessment, student affairs, rights and responsibilities, 
and financial aid. 

312-779. Technical Education in Community Junior Colleges Credit 3(3-0) 

Offers techniques in identifying community needs and in planning curriculums and 
courses for technical/vocational education. Stresses the role of the two-year college in 
middle manpower development. 

312-781. Internship Credit 3(3-0) 

Offers opportunities for students to spend one semester as a teaching or adminis- 
trative intern in a community college or technical institute in the North Carolina Com- 
munity College System. Registration only by permission of the instructor. 

312-A785. Independent Readings in Education I Credit 1(0-2) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Pre- 
requisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

312-A786. Independent Readings in Education II Credit 2(0-4) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Pre- 
requisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

312-A787. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3(0-6) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Pre- 
requisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

3 1 2- A790. Seminar in Education Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive study, investigation, or research in selected areas of education; reports 
and constructive criticism. Prerequisite: A minimum of 24 hours in prescribed 
graduate courses. 

3 1 2- A79 1 . Thesis Research Credit 3(3-0) 

312-792. Advanced Seminar and Internship in Education 

Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Seminar and supervised internship experiences relating to problems in administra- 
tion and to the needs and interests of the student (Restricted to students in the Sixth- 
Year Program in Administration.) 

ADULT EDUCATION 

B. W. Harris, Chairman 

Office: Center for Continuing Education 

Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
340-65 1 . Introduction to Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

The purpose is to develop a view of Adult Education as a broad, diverse, and com- 
plex field of study, research and professional practice. Students will survey many in- 



50 



stitutions, firms, programs, and individual activities for insights into the scope of 
Adult Education, its client groups, their reasons for become adult learners, and the 
range of methods and materials used to enable adults to learn. 

340-652. Methods in Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Adult Ed. 671) 

Methods of informal instruction, group leadership, conference planning and tech- 
niques in handling various issues of interest to adults. For persons preparing to con- 
duct adult education programs as well as those preparing to serve as instructors or 
leaders in the public schools and/or in various agencies serving adults. 

340-653. Adult Development and Learning Credit 3(3-0) 

The focus is on adult development psychology and learning theory. Adult develop- 
ment and learning is grounded in human developmental psychology, and enables stu- 
dents to investigate the life. From the research literature of adult life stages, students 
will be asked to read works of Freud, Havinghurst, Erikson, Gould, Levinson, 
Vaillant, and Klemme. 

340-654. Gerontology Credit 3(3-0) 

The basic purpose of this course is to study the process of aging. Attention will be 
given to the influence of cultural, sociological, and economic factors. An important 
phase of the course will deal with planning for retirement. 

340-650. Special Problems in Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Special topics, individual and group study projects, research, workshops, seminars, 
summer institutes, travel study tours and organized visitations in areas of adult 
education worked out and agreed upon by participating students and the department 
of Adult Education and Community Services. 

Courses Restricted to Graduate Students Only 
340-700. History and Philosophy of Adult/Continuing Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of historical and philosophical foundations and thought which have influ- 
enced how adult needs have been met through learning. Consideration will be given to 
the thinking upon which teaching and learning were based during ancient times 
through the present time. 

340-701. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of 

Adult/Continuing Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of theories, concepts, and practices as related to the functions, 
planning, organizing, staffing, financing, motivating, decision-making, evaluating, 
and delegating in an Adult Education organization. 

340-702. Practicum in Teaching Adults Credit 3(1-4) 

Practical experience in involving a group of adults in a teaching-learning ex- 
perience. Under supervision, the practice teacher will have an opportunity to apply 
concepts, teaching methods, and instructional materials in a real life situation. Pre- 
requisites: Adult Edu. 651, 653, and 700. 

340-703. Seminar on Contemporary Issues in 

Adult/Continuing Education Credit 1(1-0) 

This course is integrative in nature, thereby offering the student an opportunity to 
synthesize concepts, theories, and methods of teaching learned in earlier courses. Stu- 
dents will be encouraged to further explore areas of special interest. 



51 



340-704. Independent Study Credit 2(2-0) 

This course permits a student to undertake an analysis of a problem, through in- 
dividual study outside the traditional classroom setting. The problem may be selected 
from either travel, hobby, or a related job experience. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Instructor. 

340-705. Thesis Research in Adult Education Credit: To be arranged 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 
A. P. Bell, Chairperson 
Office: 242 Carver Hall 

The Department of Agricultural Education offers programs leading to the Master of 
Science Degree. The programs are designed to meet the needs of individual students 
and emphasize the professional improvement of teachers and professional workers in 
related areas. They provide advanced preparation for employment in administration, 
supervision, teacher education, and research in agricultural education and related 
fields. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

1 10-601. Adult Education in Occupational Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1271) 

A study of the principles and problems of organizing and conducting programs for 
adults. Emphasis is given to the principles of conducting organized instruction. 

1 10-603. Problem Teaching in Agricultural Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1273) 

Practice in setting up problems for teaching unit courses in vocational agriculture. 

1 10-604. Public Relations in Vocational Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag.Ed 1274) 

Principles and practices of organizing, developing, and implementing public rela- 
tions for promoting local programs. 

110-605. Guidance and Group Instruction in Occupational Education 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1275) Credit 3(3-0) 

Guidance and group instruction applied to agricultural occupations and other prob- 
lems of students in vocational education. 

1 10-606. Cooperative Work-Study Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles, theories, organization, and administration of cooperative work ex- 
perience programs. 

110-607. Environmental Education 

Principles and practices of understanding the environment and the interrelated 
complexities of the environment. The course will include a study of agricultural oc- 
cupations related to the environment and materials that need to be developed for use 
by teachers of agriculture and other professional workers. 

Ag-Ed 608. Agricultural Extension Organization and Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles, objectives, organization, program development, and methods in 
cooperative extension. 



52 



Ag-Ed 609. Community Analysis and Rural Life Credit 3(3-0) 

Educational processes, structure and function of rural society, and the role which 
diverse organizations, agencies, and institutions play in the education and adjustment 
of rural people to the demands of modern society. 

Ag-Ed 664. Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed for persons who teach or plan to teach middle grades occupational explora- 
tion programs. Emphasis will be placed on occupational exploration in the curricu- 
lum, sources and uses of occupational information, approaches to middle grades 
teaching, and philosophy and concepts of occupational education. This course will be 
taught in cooperation with the departments of Business Education and Administra- 
tive Services, Home Economics, and Industrial Education. 

Ag-Ed 665. Occupational Exploration in the Middle Grades — 

Agricultural Occupations Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis will be placed on curriculum, methods and techniques of teaching, and 

resources and facilities for teaching in the agricultural and environmental occupations 

cluster including Agribusiness and Natural Resources, Environmental Control, 

Hospitality and Recreation, and Marine Science. 

For Graduate Students Only 

1 10-700. Seminar in Agricultural Education Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1285) 
A review of current problems and practices in the field of agricultural education. 

1 10-702. Methods and Techniques of Public Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1286) 

A study of the means and methods of promoting and publicizing local community 
programs. 

1 10-703. Scientific Methods in Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods of procedures in investigation and experimentation in education, accom- 
panied by critical examination of studies made in agricultural education and related 
fields. A research problem is developed under the supervision of the staff. 

1 10-704. Philosophy of Occupational Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1288) 

This course deals with the underlying philosophy and basic principles of vocational 
education. Emphasis is placed upon the factors contributing to the nature, purpose, 
scope, organization, and administration of vocational education in agriculture. 

110-705. Recent Developments and Trends in Agricultural Education 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1289) Credit 3(3-0) 

The course includes an intensive treatment of the various subject matter fields to 
keep teachers up-to-date technically as well as professionally. It is designed to cover 
the developments and trends in agricultural education. 

706. Comparative Education in Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis will be placed on basic development concepts and principles. Various 
types of education and their implication to agriculture will be studied to develop an 
understanding of international developments in agriculture. Students may meet 
course requirements by studying and working in a developing country. (Enrollment by 
permission of department) 



53 



707. Issues in Community Development and Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of major issues and problems confronting rural and/or urban education in 
the United States and other countries with implications for program planning and 
development. Special attention will be given to adult education and community 
development. Students may meet course requirements by studying and working in 
other countries. (Enrollment by permission of department) 

110-705. Community Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1290) 

A study of the common problems of the community that relate to agriculture and 
related areas and of solutions for these problems. 

110-751. Methods and Techniques of Supervision in Agricultural Education 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1291) Credit 3(3-0) 

The course includes the common methods and techniques that should be used in 
organizing and supervising agricultural education on state and local levels. In addi- 
tion, the course will include supervision of student teaching. 

1 10-752. Administration and Supervision Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1292) 

A study of administrative and supervisory problems; the practices and policies of 
local, state, and federal agencies dealing with administration and supervision of 
vocational education. 

110-753. Program Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1293) 

Consideration is given to the community as a unit for program planning in agricul- 
tural education. Special emphasis on collecting and interpreting basic data for- 
mulating objectives, developing and evaluating community programs. 

1 10-754. History of Agricultural Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1294) 

Historical development, social and philosophical foundations, and current status in 
relation to the total vocational education program. Special attention is given to 
agricultural education as it developed in the United States. 

1 10-706. Thesis Research in Agricultural Education Credit 3 sem hrs. 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

George A. Johnson, Chairperson 

Office: Ward Hall 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

1 20-60 1 . Principles of Animal Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly A.H. 1371) 

A study of fundamentals of modern animal nutrition including classification of 
nutrients, their general metabolism and role in productive functions. (Prerequisite: 
A.H. 404.) 

120-602. Animal Science Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly A.H. 1372) 



54 



A review and discussion of current literature pertaining to all phases of animal 
husbandry. 

120-603. Advanced Livestock Management Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly A.H. 1373) 

Special work in problems dealing with feeding, breeding, and management in the 
production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

For Graduate Students Only 

120-690. Selection of Meat and Meat Products Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly A.H. 1385) 

Identification, grading, and cutting of meats. 

120-702. Advanced Livestock Marketing Credit 3(3-0) 

Survey of recent research and developments in the methods of marketing livestock, 
and problems involved in the marketing process. 

120-703. Advanced Livestock Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Review of research relating to various phases of livestock production; fitting the 
livestock enterprise into the whole farm system. Special attention to overall economic 
operation. 

DAIRY SCIENCE 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

120-604. Dairy Seminar I Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Dairy Husb. 2374) 

Research on subjects relating to the dairy industry and methods of preparing and 
presenting such research. 

120-605. Dairy Seminar II Credit 1(1-0) 

A continuation of 604. (Formerly Dairy Husb. 1375) 

ART 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Chairperson 

Office: Frazier Hall 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
program in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree, 
Master of Science in Education with a concentration in art, must hold or be qualified 
to hold a "Class A" teaching certificate in art. The areas covered should be: painting, 
ceramics, or sculpture, design, art history, and crafts. Each applicant for admission is 
required to submit a portfolio of his/her work. 

A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to satisfy these re- 
quirements by enrolling in appropriate undergraduate courses before beginning 
his/her graduate studies in art. 

Requirements for a Degree 

Non-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 



55 



Master of Science degree in Education, the student must complete the following: Art 
720, 721, 722, and nine additional hours of art selected from the following courses: 602, 
603, 604, 605, 606, 607, and 608. A student must also take 6 semester hours of electives 
in art, education or related fields. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science degree in Education, the student must complete the following: Art 
720, 721, 722, and nine additional hours of art selected from the following courses: 602, 
603, 604, 605, 606, 607, and 608. A student must also take 3 semester hours of electives 
in art, education or related fields, and thesis. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

2 1 1 -600. Public School Art Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3270) 

Study of materials, methods, and procedures in teaching art in public schools. 
Special emphasis is placed on selection and organization of materials, seasonal pro- 
jects, and lesson plans. 

2 1 1 -602. Seminar in Art History Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3272) 

Investigation in depth of the background influences which condition stylistic 
changes in art forms by analyzing and interpreting works of representative 
personalities. 

211-603. Studio Techniques Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3272) 

Demonstrations that illustrate and emphasize the technical potentials of varied 
media. These techniques are analyzed and discussed as a point of departure for in- 
dividual expression. 

2 1 1 -604. Ceramics Workshop Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3274) 

Advanced studio problems and projects in ceramics with emphasis on independent 
creative work. The student is given opportunity for original research and is en- 
couraged to work toward the development of a personal style in the perfection of 
technique. 

211-605. Printmaking Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3275) 

Investigation of traditional and experimental methods in printmaking. Advanced 
studio problems in woodcut etching, lithography, and serigraphy. 

211-606. Sculpture Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3276) 

Further study of sculpture with an expansion of techniques. Individual problems for 
advanced students. 

211-607. Project Seminar Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly Art 3277) 

Advanced specialized studies in creative painting, design, and sculpture. By means 
of discussion and suggestions, this seminar intends to solve various problems which 
might arise in each work. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



56 



211-608. Arts and Crafts Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3278) 

Creative experimentation with a variety of materials, tools, and processes: projects 
in wood, metal construction, fabric design, and leather craft. 

For Graduates Only 

720. Methods of Criticism, Interpretation, and Research Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 3285) 

Investigation of the theories of art, methods of criticism and their application. 

721. Research and Analysis Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 3286) 

Individual projects relating to contemporary art in Europe and America. Two hours 
lecture and two hours studio or conference per week. 

722. Seminar in Art Education Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 3287) 

Special problems in the teaching and supervision of art in the public schools; lab- 
oratory experiences in a variety of media; observations, readings, dicussions and 
lectures. 

BIOLOGY 

Arthur Hicks, Chairperson 

Office: 102 Barnes Hall 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
programs in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree 
of Master of Science in Education with concentration in Biology must hold or be 
qualified to hold a class A teaching certificate in Biology. 

Requirements for a Degree 

Noyi-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following courses or 
their equivalent: 

1. Biology 661, 662, 663, 700, 765, and 766 (or 760-761). 

2. 6 s.h. of electives in education, biology, or subject related to biology. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following courses or 
their equivalent: 

1. Biology 661, 662, 663, 700, 765, and 862 or 863. 

2. 3 hours of electives in education, biology, or related fields. 

3. Thesis. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

22 1 -600. General Science for Elementary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Gen. Sci. 1570) 



57 



This course will consider some of the fundamental principles of the life and physical 
sciences in an integrated manner in the light of present society needs. 

BOTANY 

221-640. Plant Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1572) 

A presentation of fundamental botanical concepts to broaden the background of 
high school biology teachers. Bacteria, fungi, and other microscopic plants will be con- 
sidered as well as certain higher forms of plants. The course will consist of lectures, 
laboratory projects, and field trips. 

221-642. Special Problems in Botany Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1573) 

Open to advanced students in botany for investigation of specific problems. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 140 or 640. 

ZOOLOGY 

221-659. Foundational Radiobiology Credit 3(1-4) 

A study of the fundamental concepts, procedures and applications of the principles 
which underlie atomic radiation and methods employed in its detection and measure- 
ment. Prerequisites: a minimum of 1 year of Physics, 2 years of Chemistry, Bio. 260, 
Bio. 465. 

221-660. Special Problems in Zoology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Biol. 1574) 
Open to students qualified to do research in zoology. 

22 1 -66 1 . Mammalian Biology Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the evolutionary history, classification, adaptation and variation of repre- 
sentative mammals with special emphasis on the prenatal variations in prototherian, 
metatherian and eutherian types. Prerequisites: 140 and 160. 

221-662. Biology of Sex Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Biol. 1576) 

Lectures on the origin and development of the germ cells and reproductive systems 
in selected animal forms. Prerequisite: Zoology 160 or equivalent. 

221-663. Cytology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Biol. 1577) 

Study of the cell with lectures and periodic student reports on modern advances in 
cellular biology. Prerequisite: Zoology 465 or special consent of instructor. 

221-664. Histo-Chemical Technique Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Biol. 1578) 
Designed to develop skills in the preparation of cells, tissues and organs for micro- 
scopic observation and study. Prerequisite: Zoology 160. 

221-665. Nature Study Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Biol. 1579) 
A study of diversified organisms, their habits, life histories, defenses, sex relation- 
ships, period activities, and economic values; designed to acquaint the student with 
fundamental knowledge that should lead to a fuller appreciation of nature. 



58 



221-666. Experimental Embryology Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Biol. 1580) 

A comprehensive lecture-seminar course covering the more recent literature on ex- 
perimental embryology and developmental physiology. Experimental studies treating 
amphibian, chick and roden development are designed as laboratory projects. Pre- 
requisite: Biol. 561 or equivalent. 

221-667. Animal Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Biol. 1581) 
A lecture-laboratory course stressing fundamental concepts and principles of 
biology with the aim of strengthening the background of high school teachers. 
Emphasis is placed on the principles of animal origin, structure, function, develop- 
ment, and ecological relationships. 

221-668. Animal Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of animal behavior, structure, evolution, development and regulation of 
behavior; social and ecological context; sensory and neural basis. A study of the 
qualitative and quantitative differences between behavioral characteristics at dif- 
ferent evolutionary levels, adaptiveness of differences in behavior and the develop- 
ment of behavior will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Biology 260, 466 and 561. 

221-669. Recent Advances in Cell Biology Credit 3(3-0) 

A course especially designed to meet the needs of advanced undergraduate students 
and others desirous of the more recent trends and advanced detailed knowledge con- 
cerning functions of organized cellular and sub-cellular systems. Current research as 
it relates to the molecular and fine structure bases of cell function, replication, and 
differentiation will be discussed. Prerequisites: Biology 466, 562, credit or concurrent 
registration in Chemistry 224. 

BOTANY 

221-739. Radio-isotope Techniques and Radiotracer Methods Credit 4(2-4) 

The techniques employed in the handling and measurement of radio-isotopes and 
their use as tracer agents in biological investigations. 

221-740. Essentials of Plant Anatomy Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Botany 1585) 

A study of the growth, development and organization of roots, stems, leaves, and 
reproductive organs of higher plants. Lectures, discussions, field trips, and the 
laboratories are employed in the presentation of this course. 

221-741. Applied Plant Ecology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Botany 1586) 
A study of the relations of plants to their environment with emphasis on climate 
and soil factors influencing their structure, behavior and distribution. Prerequisite: 
Biology 640, 740 or equivalent. 

221-742. Physiology of Vascular Plants Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1587) 

Selected topics on the physiology of higher plants. Relationships of light quality, in- 
tensity, and periodicity to plant growth and reproduction: photosynthesis, and photo- 
periodism. Chemical control of growth and reproduction, and the general aspect of 
plant metabolism. Lectures, conferences, laboratory work and field studies of higher 
plant ecology. 



59 



221-743. Development Plant Morphology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 5586) 

Growth and differentiation from a cellular viewpoint, with emphasis on quan- 
titative description and experimental study of development phenomena. 

221-744. Plant Nutrition Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 5587) 

A study of the subcellular organization of plants, inorganic and organic metab- 
olism and respiration. 

ZOOLOGY 

221-762. Applied Invertebrate Zoology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zoology 1590) 
A study of the lower groups of animals, especially insects, and their economic im- 
portance to the southeastern region. Lectures, field trips, and experimental work with 
local animals are stressed, as well as factors affecting growth, development and 
behavior. Prerequisite: Biology 667 or equivalent. 

221-763. Fundamentals of Vertebrate Morphology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zoology 1591) 

A study of the morphological evolution of the chordate animals from a comparative 
aspect, with lecture-demonstrations of dissected organ systems of the frog and cat. 
Reference to man is made to give this course a human approach. Prerequisite: Biology 
667 or equivalent. 

221-764. Basic Protozoology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zoology 1592) 

A study of the biology of free-living and parasitic protozoa with special emphasis on 
structure, behavior, life histories, and classification. Special attention will be given to 
free-living forms from such local animals as fish, frogs, and wild rodents. Prerequi- 
site: Biology 667. 

221-765. Introductory Experimental Zoology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zoology 1593) 

Studies of fertilization, breeding habits, regeneration, growth and differentiation of 
certain invertebrates and vertebrates from the experimental approach. Emphasis will 
be placed on laboratory procedures on the frog and the chick. 

221-766. Invertebrate Biology for Elementary and Secondary 

School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Zoology 1594) 

A study of representative invertebrate groups with emphasis on origin, structure, 
function, classification, and ecological relationships. 

221-767. Genetics and Inheritance for the Secondary 

School Teacher Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of mendelian and molecular genetics with emphasis on organic evolution, 
linkage, mutation of genes and of chromosomes, population mechanics and the rela- 
tion between genes and environment in development. Laboratory experiments with 
drosophila and maise. 

221-768. Functional Invertebrate Zoology Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 1596) 



60 



Special topics in Invertebrate Zoology to be selected for detailed study with labora- 
tory observations made on certain forms. 

221-769. Cellular Physiology Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly 1598) 

The physio-chemical aspect of protoplasm including permeability of surface ten- 
sion, cellular metabolism, and other measurable properties of living cells. 

221-860. Parasitology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 5585) 

The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism, taxonomy, physiol- 
ogy and immunology of animal parasites. 

221-861. Advanced Genetics Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 5588) 

The effects of chemical agents in the environment upon inheritance. Reports from 
the literature chiefly upon chemical mutations. Laboratory experiments on the 
chemical induction of crossing over. 

221-862. Research in Botany 3 Credit Hours 

(Formerly 5592) 

221-863. Research in Zoology 3 Credit Hours 

(Formerly 5593) 

BIOLOGY 

221-700. Environmental Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 5589) 

Problems, concepts and interpretations of relations between organisms and the en- 
vironment; an analysis of environmental factors on growth, reproduction, distribu- 
tion, and competition between organisms. 

221-701. Biological Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly 5590) 

The presentation and defense of original research, consideration of special topics in 
biology and current literature. 

221-702. Biological Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly 5591) 

A continuation of Biology 701. 

221-703. Experimental Methods in Biology Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 1597) 

Laboratory techniques for androgenesis, parabiosis, parthenogenesis, transplanta- 
tions, grafting and other experimental techniques for recent biological research. 

221-704. Seminar in Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1599) 

Lectures, reports and laboratory procedures will be presented by student partici- 
pants, staff and guest lectures on modern techniques and recent developments of se- 
lected biological problems. The nature and scope of the problem and the methods em- 
ployed to study them will be varied to suit the needs and background of the student. 



61 



221-760. Projects in Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

Special projects in biology that relate to biological instruction or research in the stu- 
dents' area of concentration. 

221-761. Seminar in Biology Credit 1(1-0) 

A seminar on selected topics and recent advances in the field of plant and animal 
biology. 

CHEMISTRY 

William B. DeLauder, Chairman 

Office: Hines 116 

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry offers the Master of Science degree in Chemistry. In 
addition to this program, the department provides instruction for those graduate stu- 
dents who wish to pursue a curriculum that can lead to a degree in Education with 
specialization in Chemistry. Individuals who desire to renew teaching certificates in 
the field may also enroll in certain courses in the department for this purpose. 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Undergraduate major in Chemistry including one year of undergraduate 
Physical Chemistry and one year of Integral and Differential Calculus. 

The Department of Chemistry in its graduate division: 

1. Provides a program of study that leads either to the M.S. degree in Chemistry or 
the M.S. degree in Education with concentration in Chemistry. 

2. Provides formal instruction in-depth in several areas of Chemistry (Inorganic, 
Organic, Physical and Biochemistry). 

3. Provides the opportunity for the development of creativity in special problems 
and research activities. 

4. Provides an opportunity for students to progress toward academic maturity by 
engaging in group discussions, developing and presenting seminar topics, writing 
up research findings, and by presenting an approved thesis to the Graduate 
School (the latter is required of all candidates for the M.S. degree in Chemistry). 

Master of Science in Chemistry 

Requirements for admission to candidacy and for the degree are listed earlier in this 
catalogue in the description of the degree programs. 

"Rising juniors, who qualify for the Graduate Program, should refer to the Under- 
graduate Bulletin for further information." 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
WITH CONCENTRATION IN CHEMISTRY 

Academic-year Program (intended for students enrolled for a year of 
residence) Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
programs in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree 
of Master of Science in Education with concentration in Chemistry must hold or be 
qualified to hold a class A teaching certificate in Chemistry and must have completed, 



62 



on the undergraduate level, a course in Physical Chemistry and a course in Integral 
and Differential Calculus (or the equivalent). 

Requirements for a Degree 

Non-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science degree in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Chemistry 611, 722, 743, 732, and 701. 

2. 5 additional s.h. in Chemistry, including a special problems course in Inorganic, 
Analytical, Organic, or Physical Chemistry. 

3. 2 hours of electives. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science degree in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Chemistry 611, 722, 743, 732, and 701. 

2. A thesis in Chemistry or Education. 

3. 4 hours of electives. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

223-610. Inorganic Synthesis Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1670) 

Discussion of theoretical principles of synthesis and development of manipulative 
skills in the synthesis of inorganic substances. Prerequisites: Chemistry 224, 431 and 
432. 

223-611. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1671) 

A course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of Inorganic Chemistry. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 441, 442 concurrent. 

223-621. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 501) 

An indepth examination of various organic mechanisms, reactions, structures, and 
kinetics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222. 

223-624. Qualitative Organic Chemistry Credit 5(3-6) 

(Formerly Chem. 1776) 

A course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 224. 

223-631. Electroanalytical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1781) 

A study of the theory and practice of polarography, Chronopotentiometry, potential 
sweep chronoampereometry and electrodeposition. The theory of diffusion and elec- 
trode kinetics will also be discussed along with the factors which influence rate 
processes, the double layer, adsorption and catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 431. 

223-641. Radiochemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1782) 

A study of the fundamental concepts, processes, and applications of nuclear chem- 
istry, including natural and artificial radioactivity, sources and chemistry of the 



63 



radioelements. Open to advanced majors and others with sufficient background in 
Chemistry and Physics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or Physics 406. 

223-642. Radioisotope Techniques and Applications Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1783) 

The techniques of measuring and handling radioisotopes and their use in Chem- 
istry, Biology, and other fields. Open to majors and non-majors. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 102, Chemistry 222. 

223-643. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics Credit 4(4-0) 

Non-relativistic wave mechanics and its application to simple systems by means of 
the operator formulation. Prerequisites: Math 222, Physics 222, and Chemistry 442 
prior or concurrent. 

223-651. General Biochemistry Credit 5(3-6) 

A study of modern Biochemistry. The course emphasizes chemical kinetics and 
energetics associated with biological reactions and includes a study of carbohydrates, 
lipids, proteins, vitamins, nucleic acids, hormones, photosynthesis, and respiration. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 431 and 442. 

For Graduate Students Only 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

223-711. Structural Inorganic Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1785) 

A study of the stereochemistry of inorganic substances; the relationship of struc- 
ture to properties; and a discussion of experimental methods. Prerequisites: Chem. 
611 and 643. 

223-716. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1686) 

A lecture course on advanced topics of Inorganic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 611 or permission of the instructor. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

223-721. Elements of Organic Chemistry Credit 3(2-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1690) 

A systematic study of the classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and in- 
dividual examples of each. Structure, nomenclature, synthesis, and characteristic 
reactions will be considered. Illustration of the familiarity of organic substances in 
everyday life will be included. In the laboratory, preparation and characterization 
reactions will be performed. 

223-722. Advanced Organic Chemistry Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1691) 

Recent developments in the areas of structural theory, sterochemistry, molecular 
rearrangement and mechanism of reactions of selected classes of organic compounds. 
Prerequisite: One year of Organic Chemistry or Chemistry 721. 

223-723. Organic Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1692) 
An advanced treatment of organic reactions designed to give the student a working 
knowledge of the scope and limitations of the important synthetic methods of Organic 
Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 722. 

64 



223-726. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1693) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Organic Chemistry. 

223-727. Organic Preparations Credit 1-2 (0-2 to 4) 

(Formerly Chem. 1694) 

An advanced laboratory course. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and purifica- 
tion of more complex organic compounds. Prerequisite: One year of Organic 
Chemistry. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

223-756. Selected Topics in Biochemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1695) 
A lecture course on advanced topics in Biochemistry. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

223-731. Modern Analytical Chemistry Credit 3(2-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1787) 

The theoretical bases of Analytical Chemistry are presented in detail. In the lab- 
oratory, these principles together with a knowledge of chemical properties are used to 
identify substances and estimate quantities in unknown samples. 

223-732. Advanced Analytical Chemistry Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1788) 

A lecture course in which the theoretical bases of Analytical Chemistry and their 
application in analysis will be reviewed with greater depth than is possible in the 
customary undergraduate courses. Equilibrium processes, including proton and elec- 
tron transfer reactions and matter-energy interactions, will be considered. Prerequi- 
site: One year of Analytical Chemistry or Chemistry 731. 

223-736. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1786) 
A lecture course on advanced topics in Analytical Chemistry. 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

223-741. Principles of Physical Chemistry I Credit 4(3-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1789) 

A reveiw of the fundamental principles of Physical Chemistry, including the deriva- 
tion of the more important equations and their application to the solution of prob- 
lems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 606 or 222. 

223-742. Principles of Physical Chemistry II Credit 4(3-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1790) 
A continuation of Chem. 741. May be taken concurrently with Chem. 741. 

223-743. Chemical Thermodynamics Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1791) 
An advanced course in which the laws of thermodynamics will be considered in their 
application to chemical processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 

223-744. Chemical Spectroscopy Credit 3(2-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1792) 

65 



An advanced course in which the principles and applications of spectroscopy will be 
considered. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 

223-746. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem 1795) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Physical Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 442 or 742. 

223-748. Colloid Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1794) 
A study of the types of colloidal systems and the fundamental principles governing 
their preparation and behavior. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 

223-749. Chemical Kinetics Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1793) 

A study of the theory of rate processes; application to the study of reaction mech- 
anisms. Prerequisites: Mathematics 222 and Chemistry 442 or 742. 

RESEARCH AND SPECIAL PROBLEMS 

223-701. Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1098) 

Presentation and discussion of library or laboratory research problems. 

223-702. Chemical Research Credit 2-5 (0-6 to 15) 

(Formerly Chem. 1085, 1806 and 1087) 

A course designed to permit qualified students to do original research in chemistry 
under the supervision of a senior staff member. May be taken for credit more than 
once. 

223-715. Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry Credit 2-4 (0-6 to 12) 

(Formerly Chem. 1088 and 1089) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical 
research by solving minor problems in Inorganic Chemistry. May be taken for credit 
more than once. 

223-725. Special Problems in Organic Chemistry Credit 2-4 (0-6 to 12) 

(Formerly Chem. 1090 and 1091) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical 
research by solving minor problems in Organic Chemistry. May be taken for credit 
more than once. 

223-735. Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry Credit 2-4 (0-6 to 12) 

(Formerly Chem. 1092 and 1093) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical 
research by solving minor problems in Analytical Chemistry. May be taken for credit 
more than once. 

223-745. Special Problems in Physical Chemistry Credit 2-4 (0-6 to 12) 

(Formerly Chem. 1094 and 1095) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical 
research by solving minor problems in Physical Chemistry. May be taken for credit 
more than once. 

223-755. Special Problems in Biochemistry Credit 2-4 (0-6 to 12) 

66 



A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical 
research by solving minor problems in Biochemistry. May be taken for credit more 
than once. 

Chemistry 763. Selected Topics In Chemistry Instruction I Credit 6(6-0) 

A study of the curriculum and educational materials developed for use in the Thir- 
teen College Curriculum Program in Physical Science. 

Chemistry 764. Selected Topics In Chemistry Instruction II Credit 6(6-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 763. 

Chemistry 765. Special Problems In Chemistry Instruction I Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to introduce students to techniques of Chemistry instruction at 
the college level. 

Chemistry 766. Special Problems In Chemistry Instruction II Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 765. 

Chemistry 767. Special Problems In Chemistry Instruction III Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Chemistry 766. 

Chemistry 768. Special Problems In Chemistry IV Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of Chemistry 767. 

THESIS RESEARCH 

223-799. Thesis Research Credit 3 Sem. Hrs. 

(Formerly Chem. 1799) 



ECONOMICS 

Sidney H. Evans, Chairperson 

Office: 325 Merrick 

ECONOMICS 

Courses Offered to Advanced Undergraduates & Graduates 
531-601. Economic Understanding Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the institutional organization and functions of the American Econ- 
omy. Special references will be made to the state of North Carolina. A prerequisite for 
all graduate students who had no undergraduate courses in Economics and wish to 
take the graduate courses in economics. No credit toward a degree in Economics. 

531-602. Manpower Problems and Prospects Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of manpower development problems and prospects, with particular 
reference to the problems of unemployment, underemployment and discrimination. 
The course will focus on problem measurement, evaluation of existing policy and 
prospect of achievement of full human resource development. The course will invite an 
interdisciplinary participation on the part of the students and faculty. Prerequisites: 
Econ. 301 or 302; Econ. 305 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

531-603. Manpower Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Manpower planning centers chiefly on the adjustement necessary to adapt labor 

resources to changing job requirements. This course is designed to prepare students to 

create plans which will facilitate this adjustment. This course will attempt to acquaint 

67 



the student with labor force and labor market behavior such that he is able to make 
planning decisions relating to job creation (increasing demand) and education and 
training (increasing supply). Planning will be done at both the national (macro) and 
local (micro) levels with special emphasis on the latter. We will further attempt to 
evaluate all planning decisions by use of Cost-Benefit Analysis and/or Multivariate 
Analysis. Prerequisite: Econ. 301 or 302; Econ. 305 or equivalent or consent of 
instructor. 

531-604. Economic Evaluation Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will cover needed tools of research design, statistical reporting, 
cost/benefit analysis and other related techniques for internal and external evalua- 
tions of human resource development programs. This course is designed both for in- 
service personnel currently employed by agencies, and for the regular student enrolled 
in a degree-granting program. 

531-610. Consumer Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature, scope and tools of 
Consumer economics. It is particularly oriented to minority groups, thus focusing on 
the economic choices currently affecting groups with rising incomes and aspirations. 
The course will consider the economic choices faced by consumers in maximizing 
satisfaction with limited means. 

531-615. Economic Political and Social Aspects of the 

Black Experience Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the political, economic and social tools of current public policy treating 
the subject of race in America. The course will examine the economic and social condi- 
tions of income inequality and explore the national committment equal opportunity. 
Special emphasis will be placed on illustrations from North Carolina and adjacent 
states. 

Courses Offered to Graduate Students 
531-701. Labor and Industrial Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

Two important sectors of the economy are examined — labor and management. 
Historical, public and governmental influences are studied. 

531-705. Government Economic Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will consider the growth of public expenditures and revenues, and debts 
of the United States; theories of taxation and tax incidence; and the effect of public ex- 
penditures and taxes on economic growth. 

531-710. Economic Development and Resource Use Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with resource and economic development in the domestic econ- 
omy and also a comparison drawn among developed, developing and undeveloped 
societies. 

531-720. Development of Economic Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

An analytical approach to the study of various economic systems, how these 
systems developed and how they are organized to carry on economic activity. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Courses Offered to Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
150-602. Leadership and Organization Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to review the theories and techniques of leadership and the 

68 



methods of training for leadership in rural and urban communities; to examine the 
methodology of the economic, political, and social decisions at the local community 
level; and to study the techniques of community organization and community develop- 
ment as tools for community problem solving. This course will also increase the stu- 
dent's knowledge and skills for more effective leadership role performance, and 
leadership development in a number of varied situations in the local community. 

150-630. Southern Resources in a Changing Economy — 

A Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

Trends and the formulation of economic and social problems in the South and par- 
ticularly in North Carolina; labor and capital mobility, agricultural as compared with 
the industrial, the problem of underemployment, and important phases of current 
economic development. Prerequisites: Econ. 301, Sociology 203 or Ag. Econ. 330. 

150-632. Agri-Business Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

The pace of Agri-business in the National and International economy; the impact of 
public policy on the industry. An analysis of policy as it relates to price support 
programs, finance, trade and resources development. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 330. 

150-634. Commodity Marketing Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Economic problems arising out of the demand, supply and distribution of specific 
agricultural commodities; the price making mechanism, marketing methods, grades, 
values, price, cost, and governmental policy. Not more than two commodities will be 
studied in any one semester. Selection of commodities and emphasis on problem areas 
will be made on the basis of current need; commodities studied will be cotton, tobacco, 
fruits and vegetables, and grains. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

150-636. Seminar in Marketing Farm Products Credit 3(3-0) 

Discussion, reports, consultation and research efforts which throw light on 
marketing problems of low income farmers in North Carolina, including National and 
International importance of locally grown products such as tobacco and cotton. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of Department Chairman. 

150-638. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics Credit 3(1-2) 

Designed for students who desire to work out special problems in the field of agri- 
cultural economics; problem definition, formulation and investigation. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the Department Chairman. 

150-640. Agri-Business Management Credit 3(2-2) 

Methods of research, plans, organization, and the application of management prin- 
ciples. Part of the student's time will be spent on consultation with Agri-business 
firms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

150-642. Seminar in Agricultural Economics Credit 2(2-0) 

Discussion reports and an appraisal of current literature on agricultural problems. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

150-644. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics I Credit 3(2-2) 

Statistical methods with special applications to agricultural problems. The statisti- 
cal table, ratios, percentages, bar charts, line charts, and frequency distribution are 
used as analytical tools. Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 300, Econ. 301, or Sociology 203. 

150-646. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics II Credit 3(2-2) 

Statistical methods with special applications to agricultural problems. The time 



69 



series analysis, sampling theory, analysis of variance, and simple correlation are used 
as analytical tools. This course is a continuation of Ag. Econ. 644. 

150-648. Appraisal and Finance of Agri-Business Firms Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of land evaluation, appraisal and taxation. The role of credit in a money 
economy, classification of credit, principles underlying the economic use of credit. The 
role of the government in the field of credit. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 

Ralph L. Wooden, Chairman 

Office: 101 Crosby Hall 

Requirements for a Degree 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required. 

In addition to courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following courses or 
their equivalent: 

1. Media Education 602, 603 and 604 and he/she must elect at least nine semester 
hours from the following: Media Education 600, 601, 606 and/or 607. 

2. A course in seminar or internship relevant to the specialty is required 

Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for 
the Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following courses 
or their equivalent: 

1. Media Education 602, 603, and 604 and he/she must elect at least nine semester 
hours from the following: Media Education 600, 601, 606 and 607 

2. Cognate courses — 3 semester hours 

3. Thesis — 3 semester hours 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

350-600. Classification of Media Collections Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-611) 

Basic course in techniques of book and non-book description, their organization for 
services in libraries through decimal classification and their subject representation in 
the public catalog. Practice in laboratory. 

350-601. Reference Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-624) 

The selection, evaluation, and use of basic reference materials with emphasis on the 
selection of materials, study of contents, methods of location, and practical 
application. 

350-602. Utilization of Educational Media Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-644) 

Applies basic concept to problems in teaching and learning with school and adult 
audiences. Relates philosophical and psychological bases of communications to 
teaching. Discusses the role of communications in problem-solving, attitude forma- 
tion, and teaching. Methods of selecting and using educational media materials effec- 
tively in teaching. Experience in operating equipment, basic techniques in media 
preparation. Practice in planning and presenting a session. 



70 



350-603. Production of Instructional Materials Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-642) 

The planning, designing, and production of opaque materials, charts, graphs, 
posters, transparencies, mounting, bulletin boards, displays, models, mock-ups, spec- 
trums, chalkboards, scriptwriting, and recording techniques. 

350-604. Educational Media Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-642) 

Planning, organizing, coordinating and administering educational media pro- 
grams. Developing criteria for selection, utilization care, and evaluation of the effec- 
tiveness of materials and equipment. Scientific arrangement of learning environ- 
ments, space and space relations. The planning of facilities and budgeting for pro- 
gram and public relations activities. 

350-605. Systems Approach and Curricular Integration Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-645) 

Analysis of subject content, learners, specifications, and evaluation of objectives, 
analysis and sequencing of tasks, design of stimulus materials, selecting and 
evaluating of materials. Planning instructional units. 

350-606. Book Selection and Related Materials for Children Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-650) 

A study of children's literature with emphasis on aids and criteria for selection of 
books and other materials for preschool through late childhood ages, story-telling, and 
an investigation of reading interests. 

350-607. Book Selection and Related Materials for Young People Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 310-651) 
A consideration of literature, reading interests, and non-book materials for young 
people. 

350-608. Programming for Instructional Radio and Television Credit 3(3-0) 

Provides the student with the historical background of radio and television, princi- 
ples and skills in utilizing the theory, language, signs and symbols, of radio and televi- 
sion. Emphasis will be focused on cooperative team teaching approach, experimenta- 
tion, and innovation as strategies for programming instruction. 

305-609. Production for Instructional Radio and Television Credit 3(1-4) 

Affords opportunities for the student to develop and utilize knowledge and skills in 
designing settings, lighting techniques, operation of controls, directing, camera opera- 
tion and care, producing and caring for visuals, video tapes, audio tapes, duplication of 
tapes, rear screen projections and sound effects, background music, also producing 
multi-media mis programs for various situations such as: slide-tape, or multi-image 
programs through film, slide, and opaque chain. Special provisions for training in 
preventive maintenance and minor repairs of equipment will be provided. 

350-610. Broadcasting for Instructional Radio and Television Credit 3(3-0) 

Prevents and evaluates live broadcast programs for instruction within the frame- 
work of acceptable criteria supported by the profession. Presenting and evaluating the 
effectiveness of videotaped or video disc recorded programs as used for instructional 
situations. To develop guidelines for quality radio and television programs. 



71 



350-700. Program Instruction Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-734) 
Theory, principles, application, and evaluation of programmed instruction tech- 
niques, survey of programmed techniques, the selection, utilization, and evaluation of 
existing programs. Survey of commercial programs, courses, and types of teaching 
machines. Practice in writing programmed instruction units. 

350-701. Media Retrieval Systems Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-735) 

A survey of various media classifications, storage and retrieval models as applied to 
information centers and their operation. Compares traditional models with the logic 
of manual, mechanical, and electronic retrieval systems. Writing models for indepen- 
dent study. 

350-702. Workshop in Educational Media Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-736) 

An exploration of recent materials, methods, and techniques and the development 
of skills and competencies in audiovisual communications. Demonstrations and 
presentations by specialists, audiovisual representatives. 

350-703. Educational Media Internship and Seminar Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 310-738) 

This is a professional laboratory designed to provide the student with on-the-job 
training and direct experiences relating to his "needs" and interest in operating, 
organizing, and administering a well-rounded Media Education program. This course 
will afford students with the opportunity and experience to work in a relevant and 
practical situation that will deepen his understandings, broaden his perspective, gain 
keener insights, and increase his skills and abilities to organize instructional 
materials, equipment and work with people. 

During a period of at least six (6) weeks, it is desired that the student will have 
specific duties and responsibilities for observing, studying, and working in the audio- 
visual media program pertaining to (1) architectural features, (2) program develop- 
ment, (3) cataloging, filing, and record keeping, (4) organizational patterns, (5) person- 
nel selection and staffing, (6) administration forms, procedures, and policies, 
materials, and equipment, (7) public relations, budgeting considerations, (8) in-service 
education, (9) program evaluation, (10) research and other concomitants, such as at- 
tending and conducting professional meetings and leadership conferences and 
seminars. 

The coordinator of the Media Education Internship Program in consultation with 
the student will arrange for his suitable placement under the guidance and supervi- 
sion of an official of the placement facility whether it be a public school system, in- 
dustry, business, governmental agency, religious organization, or otherwise. During 
his internship, the coordinator will visit, observe and confer with the student and his 
immediate supervisor. This will help to insure that the students' growth and develop- 
ment are being given primary concern, and to serve as feedback for assessing and 
evaluating his program of study at the University. The student will be required to pre- 
sent a written project describing his internship training and experiences. 

350-704. Advanced Reference and Bibliography Credit 3(3-0) 

Special reference problems, methods and materials for school libraries, includes 
cooperative aspects of librarianship and the development of bibliographies. 

350-705. Principles and Problems in Cataloging and 

Classification Credit 3(3-0) 



72 



Methods of obtaining and organizing materials for effective use in school libraries. 
A study of descriptive and subject cataloging and handling of audiovisual materials. 

350-706. Media in Special Education and Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide personnel in special education reading programs 
with experiences that will enable them to develop competencies and skills in the opera- 
tion, care, and utilization and production of instructional materials and equipment 
pertinent to the achievement of their instructional objectives. 

350-707. Professional Development of Media Personnel Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide for the promotion, stimulation and professional 
development of educational media personnel. By conducting research projects, con- 
tributing to professional publications, and serving on professional committees as ac- 
tive participants. 

350-715. Advanced Production in Instructional Radio and 

Television Credit 3(0-6) 

An indepth study of advanced methods and techniques necessary to produce quality 
instructional radio and television programs. Experimentation, innovations, and 
research will be encouraged and high production standards in keeping with those of 
Commercial Stations. Student-produced programs may be broadcast on a cooperative 
basis over local radio and television facilities. 



EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND GUIDANCE 

Wyatt D. Kirk, Chairperson 

Office: 209 Hodgin Hall 

The Department of Psychology and Guidance offers a program leading to a Master 
of Science in Education with concentration in Counselor Education (Guidance). Re- 
quirements for admission to the program and for the degree are listed earlier in this 
bulletin. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

GUIDANCE 

320-600. Introduction to Guidance Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2378) 

A foundation course for prospective teachers, part-time or full-time counselors who 
plan to do further work in the field of guidance of education. Special consideration will 
be given to the nature, scope, and principles of guidance services. No credit toward a 
concentration in guidance. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

320-623. Personality Development Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2023) 
A study of the basic processes in personality development, the contents of per- 
sonality, and the consequences of personality development. 

320-661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and development of 
mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, and emotionally and 
socially maladjusted children. 



73 



320-662. Mental Deficiency Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of types and characteristics of mental defectives; classification and diag- 
noses; criteria for institutional placement and social control of mental deficiency. 

For Graduate Students Only 

GUIDANCE 

320-705. Guidance Practicum Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 2385) 

Practice in the job of the high school counselor with students of high school age. 
Primary emphasis will be placed on counseling, but all phases of the work of the coun- 
selor will be covered. Students enrolled in this course should have completed major 
courses in their program and should have demonstrated skills in techniques, princi- 
ples, and practices in the field. (Permission must be granted by Counselor-Educator.) 

320-706. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 

(Formerly 2386) Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of methods by which guidance policies and services may be properly imple- 
mented through organizational framework; consequently, leads to more effective 
organization of current guidance programs. 

320-707. Research Seminar Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 2387) 

Critical discussions of research projects in progress and of the related literature to 
such projects. An acceptable written report is required. The course recommended for 
guidance majors in the degree program and others seeking the School Counselor's cer- 
tificate. Prerequisite: Guidance 705, prior or concurrent. 

320-714. Internship in Guidance Credit 3(1-4) 

The Internship will be concerned with experiences involved in the organization and 
operation of the many and varied public school programs and their interaction with 
community agencies. An extended period of continuous full-time experience must be 
completed by students who have not had previous teaching experience. (Permission 
must be granted by Counselor-Educator.) 

320-715. Measurement for Guidance Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2395) 

The development of understandings and skills in collecting and interpreting data 
concerning the individual, and the use of such data in case studies and follow-up 
procedures. 

320-716. Techniques of Individual Analysis Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2396) 

A study of educational and vocational testing with reference to a general frame- 
work for using statistical information in several types of counseling problems. 
Statistics necessary for the evaluation of psychological and educational measurement 
will be considered. This course also includes the measurement of aptitude, including 
special aptitude, with reference to prediction of proficiency in various occupations and 
curricula. 

320-717. Educational and Occupational Information Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2397) 

Sources and procedures of assembling information about occupations and educa- 
tions: methods of using collecting information. 

74 



320-718. Introduction to Counseling Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2398) 

Information regarding the background and theories of counseling. Consideration 
will be given to the counselor's function, counseling interview, use of records, and the 
school counselor's place in a total personnel program. 

320-719. Case Studies in Counseling Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2399) 

The development of a basic understanding of the case study technique as used in 
counseling. Compilation, analysis, diagnosis and treatment of theoretical and actual 
counseling case histories. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

320-726. Educational Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2096) 

A study of the applications of psychological principles to educational practices. 

320-727. Child Growth and Development Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2097) 

A comprehensive analysis of physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and 
development from birth through adolescence. 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND READING 

Marian L. Vick, Chairperson 

Office: Hodgin 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 
310-630. Foundations in Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic reading course; consideration of the broad field of reading— its goals and 
nature; factors affecting its growth; sequential development of skills, attitudes and in- 
terests, types of reading approaches, organization and materials in teaching the fun- 
damentals of reading. 

310-635. Teaching Reading Through the Primary Years Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods, materials, and techniques used in reading instruction of pre-school 
through grade three. An examination of learning, the teaching of reading, and 
curriculum experiences and procedures for developing reading skills. 

310-636. Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in the 

Elementary School Credit 3(3-0) 

The application of principles of learning and child development of the teaching of 
reading and the related language arts. Methods and approaches to the teaching of 
reading in the elementary school, including phonics, developmental measures, infor- 
mal testing procedures, and the construction and utilization of instructional 
materials. 

310-637. Teaching Reading in the Secondary School Credit 3(3-0) 

Nature of a developmental reading program initiating and organizing a high school 
reading program, the reading curriculum, including reading in the content subjects, 
critical reading, procedures and techniques, and corrective and remedial aspects. 



75 



310-638. Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods, techniques and materials used in the diagnosis of reading problems in the 
kindergarten-primary area through the intermediate level. Attention upon the pupil 
and the interpretation of physiological, psychological, sociological, and educational 
factors affecting learning to read. Opportunity for identification analysis interpreta- 
tion on, and strategies for fulfilling the reading needs of all pupils. 

310-639. Reading Practicum Credit 3(0-6) 

Application of methods, materials and professional practices relevant to teaching 
pupils. Provisions for participation in and teaching of reading. Designed to coordinate 
the student's background in reading, diagnosis, learning, and materials. Student 
teaching in a public school. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours in reading. 

310-640. Reading for the Atypical Learner Credit 3(3-0) 

Attention to the gifted child, the able retarded, the slow learner, the disadvan- 
taged, and the linguistically different child. Special interest groups will be formed for 
investigation reports. 

310-660. Introduction to Exceptional Children Credit 3(3-0) 

An overview of the educational needs of exceptional or "different" children in the 
regular classroom situation; emphasis placed on classroom techniques known to be 
most helpful to children having hearing losses, speech disorders, visual problems, 
emotional, social handicaps and intelligence deviation, including slow-learners and 
gifted children. An introduction to the area of special education. Designed for 
classroom teachers. 

310-661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and development of 
mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, and emotionally and 
socially maladjusted children. 

310-664. Materials, Methods and Problems in Teaching 

Mentally Retarded Children Credit 3(2-2) 

Basic organization of programs for the education of the mentally retarded; 
classification and testing of mental defectives; curriculum development and principles 
of teaching intellectually slow children. Attention is also given to the provision of op- 
portunities for observing and working with children who have been classified as men- 
tally retarded. 

For Graduate Students Only 
310-721. Curriculum in the Elementary School Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts of curriculum and curriculum development with attention to curric- 
ulum issues and to desirable instructional practices in the elementary school. 

310-739. Reading in the Content Areas Credit 3(3-0) 

Attention on reading, problems and procedures and materials for improving 
reading in the social studies, science, English, mathematics, foreign language, home 
economics and other fields. 

310-740. Problems in the Improvement of Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of current problems, issues, trends and approaches in the teaching of reading 

including investigations of underlying principles of reading improvement; coverage of 

appraisal techniques, materials and procedures, innovative and corrective measures; 



76 



and application of research data and literature. Prerequisite: A previous graduate 
course in reading. 

310-741. Advanced Diagnosis in Reading Instruction Credit 3(3-0) 

The diagnosis and treatment of reading difficulties. Study and interpretation of se- 
lected tests useful in understanding and analyzing physiological, psychological, 
sociological and educational factors related to reading difficulties. Case studies and 
group diagnosis. 

310-742. Organization and Administration of Reading Programs Credit 3(3-0) 
Administrative acts requisite to the creation and guidance of a well-balanced, 
school-wide reading program. For all school personnel who are in a position to make 
administrative decisions regarding the school reading program. 

310-743. Advanced Practicum in Reading Credit 3(0-6) 

Actual experiences with youth and teachers in professional activities. 

310-744. Seminar and Research in Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

Evaluation of recent research concerning findings, approaches, innovations, and 
organization of reading instructions. Selected topics for reports and research projects. 
Independent study of selected topics of experimentation. Prerequisite: 24 semester 
credit hours in graduate courses. 

310-781. Issues in Elementary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical review of the background and functions of the elementary school as a 
social institution. Attention is given to increasing the ability to formulate the 
generalizations of development and learning into a meaningful framework for ap- 
praising current educational thinking and practice and predicting the direction in 
which these must move if elementary school programs are to continue to improve. 

310-783. Current Research in Elementary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical analysis of the current research in elementary education and the implica- 
tions of such for elementary school educative experiences. 

310-E785. Independent Reading in Education I Credit 1(0-2) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Pre- 
requisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

310-E786. Independent Readings in Education II Credit 2(0-4) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Pre- 
requisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

310-E787. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3(0-6) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Pre- 
requisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 



77 



ENGINEERING 

William J. Craft, Assistant Dean, School of Engineering 

W. A. Streat, Chairperson, Architectural Engineering 

Winser Alexander, Chairperson, Electrical Engineering 

Victor Zaloom, Chairperson, Industrial Engineering 

David Klett, Chairperson, Mechanical Engineering 

Office: Graham Hall 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
400-602. Advanced Strength of Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

Stress-strain in relations as applied to statically indeterminate structures, bending 
in curved bars, plates, shells, and beams on elastic foundations; strain energy concepts 
for formulation of flexibility matrix on finite elements; bending in beams and plates; 
introduction to cartesian tensor notation and matrix structural analysis. Prerequi- 
site: 440-336 or equivalent. 

400-603. Advanced Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Statistical mechanics and microscopic properties from statistical methods. Equilib- 
rium information, generalized coordinates, and general variables. Prerequisite: 440- 
442 or equivalent. 

400-606. Automatic Control Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

The automatic control problem; review of operational calculus; state and transient 
solutions of feedback control systems; types of servo-mechanisms and control 
systems; design principles. Prerequisite: 420-400 or equivalent. 

400-608. Solid State Energy Conversion Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of semiconductor and solar radiation principles. Operation and design of 
solid state thermoelectric generators. Operation and design of solar cells. Use of solar 
collectors and solar cells in terrestrial applications. Prerequisites: 227-406 & 420-460 or 
consent of instructor. 

400-610. Quantum Theory for the Solid State Credit 3(3-0) 

Quantum theory of solids for research in the solid state area. Topics covered: the 
many-body Hamiltonian, quantum statistics, free energy, crystal binding and sym- 
metry, Fermi and Bose Gases, lattice vibrations, electron-phonon interactions, 
semiconduction, superconduction, magnetic interactions, effects of crystalline imper- 
fections on single crystal behavior. Prerequisites: 227-605. 

400-612. Modulation Theory & Communication Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental principles of modulation theory applied to amplitude, single and dou- 
ble side band, frequency, pulse amplitude, pulse duration, pulse code and multiplexing 
modulation methods and their application to communication systems are studied. 
Random signals, noise considerations and probability theory are introduced. Pre- 
requisites: 420-300, 420-320 & 225-500. 

400-616. Physics of Solid State Devices Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory of crystal growth, semiconductor behavior, and semiconductor applications. 
Physics and chemistry of crystal growth, phase diagrams, doping, growth related and 
thermally produced defects, diffusion theory, band theory, density of states, mobility, 
deep impurities, p-n junction theory, continuity equations, solar cells, light emitting 
diodes, solid state detectors. Prerequisites: 227-408 or consent of instructor. 



78 



400-618. Discrete Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis and design of discrete-time systems through time-domain and z-domain 
techniques; time-domain synthesis and optimal control; mathematical and physical 
aspects of selected classes of computer control systems; computer simulation. Pre- 
requisites: 420-400 or consent of instructor. 

400-620. Computer Software Design Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to structured programming techniques that lead to error-free pro- 
grams. Concepts of making computers more accessible and useful. Compilers and in- 
terpreters will be reviewed as examples. Operating systems will be covered as time 
allows. Prerequisites: 420-460, 420-300. 

400-622. Electronic Engineering Credit 4(3-3) 

A study of various types of electronic circuits used in engineering practice-wave 
shaping and computing circuits, photosensitive devices and circuits; control and 
switching circuits; modulation and demodulation circuits. Coordinated labortory work 
with industrial applications and special projects. Prerequisite: 420-460 or equivalent. 

400-627. Fundamentals of Digital Logic Credit 3(3-0) 

Systematic approach to design and understanding of logic circuits. A review of 
Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential design, and usage of common logic 
devices is covered. Current commercial devices are referred to as examples. Prerequi- 
sites: 420-300, 420-460. 

400-628. Foundation Engineering Credit 3(2-2) 

Subsoil investigations, analysis and design of foundations and other substructures. 
Caisson and cofferdam design and methods of construction— ground water control. 
Prerequisite: 410-564 or equivalent. 

400-630. Digital Signal Processing I Credit 3(3-0) 

Develop working knowledge of basic signal processing functions such as digital 
filtering, spectral analysis, and detection/post detection processing. Methods of 
generating the coefficients of the digital filters will be derived. Alternate structures 
for filters such as infinite impulse response and finite impulse response will be com- 
pared. The effect of finite register length will be covered. Prerequisites: 420-400 & 225- 
500 or consent of instructor. 

400-632. Information Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Probability theory and its application in the analysis of information transfer. 
Special attention is given to information in communications, random signals, noise 
processes, microscopic processes, and macroscopic events. Prerequisite: 420-400 or 
equivalent. 

400-633. Digital Electronics Credit 3(3-0) 

Families of logic: Resistor-transistor logic (RTL), integrated-injection logic (IIL), 
Diode-transistor logic (DTL), Transistor-transistor Logic (TTL), Emitter-coupled logic 
(ECL), MOS gates and CMOS gates. Basic digitial structures: Flip-flops. Registers and 
counters. Interface between digital and analog signals. Prerequisites: 420-460. 

400-635. Structural Steel Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and design of structural components: Tension members, compression mem- 
bers, beams, and connections. Theory and design of structural systems: Single and 
multistory frames with gravity and lateral loads, arches and composite construction. 
Prerequisite: 410-457. 



79 



400-636. Computer Methods in Power Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Modeling and analysis of electric power systems, system load flow analysis, optimal 
operation and contingency planning, transients and surge phenomena, system 
stability. Digital computer solutions emphasized. Prerequisites: 420-430. 

400-637. Power Systems Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the dilemma facing the power industry, system model load flow problem, 
voltage profiles, impact of exponential growth and outages, simple fault studies, 
blackouts. Digital computer solution emphasized. Prerequisites: 420-430. 

400-640. Advanced Engineering Economy Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of traditional methods. Replacement analysis. Capital planning and 
budgeting. Risk and uncertainty methodologies. Decision tree analysis. Multiple 
criteria analysis. Prerequisites: IE 460 or consent of instructor. 

400-644. Matrix Analysis of Structures Credit 3(2-2) 

Lecture and Laboratory. Review of Matrix algebra; statically and kinematically, in- 
determinate structures; introduction of flexibility and stiffness methods; applications 
to beams, plane trusses and plane frames. Prerequisite: 410-457 or equivalent. 

400-646. Network Synthesis Credit 3(3-0) 

Use of positive real functions in the synthesis of passive networks. Investigation of 
the properties of the driving point and transfer functions of passive networks and syn- 
thesis of one and two port networks by positive real functions. Prerequisites: 420-300. 

400-648. Numerical Analysis for Engineers Credit 3(3-0) 

Scientific programming, error analysis, matrix algebra, eigenvalue problems, 
curve-fitting approximations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integra- 
tion, solutions to simultaneous equations, and numerical solutions of differential 
equations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

400-650. Operations Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Management decision making, queuing theory, probability and sequences, formula- 
tion of mathematical models of processes with orientation to optimizing by use of 
digital computers. Prerequisite: 225-224 or equivalent. 

400-652. Plates and Shells Credit 4(2-4) 

Lecture and Laboratory. Introduction to plane plate theory; membrane stresses in 
shells with axial symmetry; cylindrical shells; applications in the design of shell roofs, 
tanks pipelines and pressure vessels. Prerequisite: 410-455 or equivalent. 

400-654. Projects in Electronic Networks and Systems Credit 3(1-6) 

Special topics and laboratory work of special interest to students in electronic net- 
works and communications circuits; most of the work is carried on by the project 
method and emphasizes actual circuit construction. Prerequisite: 420-300 or equiva- 
lent. 

400-658. Project Management and Scheduling Credit 3(3-0) 

Project scheduling with CPM and PERT. Scheduling within resource constraint. 
Cost scheduling. Cost estimation with emphasis on learning curves. Assembly line 
balancing. Introduction to theory of sequencing/scheduling with applications of 
priority rules and Heuristic Methods. Prerequisites: IE 320 or consent of instructor. 



80 



400-660. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit Variable (1-3) 

Selected engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. The topics will be se- 
lected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to the programs of the 
students enrolled. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 

400-662. Reliability Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of probability theory; combinatorial reliability; catastrophic-failure models; 
system reliability; reliability improvement; statistical parameter and interval estima- 
tion for reliability functions. Prerequisites: IE 320 or consent of instructor. 

400-664. Safety Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

History. Legislation. Engineering safety analysis. OSHA (i.e., Occupational Safety 
and Health Act). Safety program organization and Procedures. Prerequisites: Senior 
standing in engineering or consent of instructor. 

400-666. Special Projects Credit Variable (1-3) 

Study arranged on a special engineering topic of interest to student faculty member, 
who will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or experimental and encourage 
independent study. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

400-669. A Survey of Operations Research Methodologies Credit 3(3-0) 

Classical optimization. Generalized linear programming. Assignment technique. 
Transportation technique. Queueing. Dynamic programming. Prerequisite: Math 117 
or consent of instructor. 

400-670. Semiconductor Theory and Devices Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the phenomena of solid-state conduction and devices using band models; 
excess carrier in semiconductors; p-n junctions and devices; bipolar junction tran- 
sistor; field-effect transistors; integrated circuits. Prerequisite: 227-406 and 420-460. 

400-672. Theory of Elasticity Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction; stress; strain; stress-strain relations; energy principles; special topics. 
Prerequisites: 440-336 and 225-565 or equivalent. 

400-676. Microprocessors: Theory and Practice Credit 4(3-2) 

An introductory survey of the microcomputer world. Architecture of several repre- 
sentative types will be studied and compared. Software development systems will be 
reviewed. Interfacing the Microcomputer to peripheral devices will be emphasized. 
Students will work with actual components in the lab. Prerequisite: 400-627. 

400-678. Engineering Management Credit 3(3-0) 

A brief review of engineering management history and its relationship to industrial 
engineering, operations research, management science and technical engineering dis- 
ciplines. Planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling in an engineering en- 
vironment. Prerequisites: Senior standing in engineering or consent of instructor. 

400-680. Solid State Technology Lab Techniques I 

Credit Variable (1-3) 

Lectures and experiments in measurement of semi-conductor material properties 
and semi-conductor device characteristics. Mobility, resistivity, lifetime, optical ab- 
sorption; semi-conductor diode I-V and C-V measurement techniques. Prerequisite: 
400-670 or consent of instructor. 



81 



400-683. Probability and Random Processes Credit 3(3-0) 

Sample space and events, conditional probabilities independent events, Bayes' for- 
mula, discrete random variables, continuous random variables, expectation of random 
variable, joint distribution, conditional expectation, Markov chains, stationary 
processes, ergodicity, correction and power spectrum of stationary processes. Poisson 
processes. Gaussian processes. Prerequisite: 420-400. 

400-688. Experimental Stress Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and methods of experimental stress analysis. Photo-elastic and micro- 
measurement techniques applied to strain and stress investigations. Experiments us- 
ing structural models. Prerequisite: 410-457 or 400-602 or equivalent. 

400-700. Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design Credit 3(2-2) 

Advanced theory and methods applied to the design of reinforced concrete struc- 
tures, including yield line methods, ultimate strength theory and limit design. Pre- 
requisite: 410-455 or equivalent. 

400-701. Advanced Structural Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

The analysis of various types of structural problems, including the application of 
modern analytical methods. Prerequisite: 410-562 or equivalent. 

400-703. Research Techniques in Material Science Credit Variable (1-3) 

Familiarization with the tools of experimental materials science; instrumentation; 
vacuum technology, temperature measurement and control; characterization and 
analysis of materials by such techniques as electron diffraction and imaging, spec- 
troscopy, calorimetry, and others. Prerequisite: 227-406 or consent of instructor. 

400-705. Solid State Devices Credit 3(3-0) 

Semiconductor heterojunctions and metal semiconductor junctions. Semiconductor 
heterojunction models and diode behavior. Optoelectronic and other bulk-effect semi- 
conductor devices. Advanced treatment of bipolar transistors and field effect tran- 
sistors. Prerequisite: 400-680 or consent of instructor. 

400-707. Physical Tensor Properties of Crystals Credit 3(3-0) 

Tensor analysis; crystal symmetry and symmetry transformations; dielectric, mag- 
netic and elastic anisotropic properties of crystals; interaction effects and diagrams, 
piezoelectric and optical properties of crystals. Prerequisite: 400-680 or consent of 
instructor. 

400-710. Boundary Layer Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of fluid flow with effects of viscosity analyzed as a boundary layer 
phenomena derivation of general equations of motion, velocity potential and stream 
function, perturbation theory and determination of drag and life for subsonic and 
supersonic flows. Prerequisite: 440-568 or equivalent. 

400-712. Work Measurement Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

A review of classical methods of engineering and work measurement. Critical 
analysis of the underlying theory. Analysis of wage incentives systems. Prerequisite: 
IE 410 or consent of instructor. 

400-714. Industrial Simulation Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the GPSS (i.e., General Purpose Simulation System) language including a 
term project. Review of other simulation languages, such as: (1) Industrial Dynamics, 
(2) CSMP, (3) GASP and (4) SIMSCRIPT. Prerequisite: IE 210 & IE 320 or consent of 
instructor. 

82 



400-715. Continuum Mechanics Credit 3(3-0) 

The applications of the laws of mechanics and thermo-dynamics to the continuum: a 
rigorous development of the general equations applied to a continuum, the application 
and reduction or the general equations for specific cases of both solids and fluids. Pre- 
requisite: 440-336 or equivalent. 

400-718. Advanced Quality Control Credit 3(3-0) 

Quality control system philosophy. General theory of control charts, selection & use 
including advanced methods. Review of sampling distributions, analysis of accep- 
tance sampling plans. Prerequisite: IE 510 or consent of instructor. 

400-719. Design of Buildings for Extreme Wind and 

Earthquake Forces Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of structural dynamics; response of buildings to earthquake induced 
forces; evaluation of earthquake forces using the response spectra; study of the 
behavior of wind, variation in wind velocity with respect to topography and height 
above ground; the study of the response of building components to hurricanes and tor- 
nadoes. Prerequisite: 225-300, 410-561, and 410-563 or 400-635. 

400-722. Electromagnetic Wave Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental electromagnetic concepts at ultra-high frequencies and above; 
analysis of transmission lines and networks; Maxwell equations and their applica- 
tions; wave guides and radiating systems. Prerequisite: 420-450 or equivalent. 

400-724. Theory of Linear Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

State space representation of dynamical systems. Analysis techniques for linear 
models in control systems, network theory, and signal processing. Continuous, dis- 
crete and sampled representations. Prerequisite: 420-400, and 400-606. 

400-726. Systems Analysis and Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis and development of socio-economic system theory. Case studies. System 
study term project. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering. 

400-730. Industrial Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Study DYNAMO language including a term project. Analysis of classical industrial 
dynamics models and industrial dynamics system methodologies. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing in engineering. 

400-733. Operations Research II Credit 3(3-0) 

Linear approximations to non-linear programming; the Kuhn-Tucker Theory of 
NLP; convex programming; geometric programming; general theory of optimization. 
Prerequisite: 400-650. 

400-735. Heath Transfer I— Conduction Credit 3(3-0) 

The development and application of the general energy equations. Heat transfer 
through walls, cylinders, real boundary conditions, and numerical procedures. Pre- 
requisite: 440-562 or equivalent. 

400-736. Heat Transfer II— Radiation Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of energy transfer by means of thermal radiation. Black body radiation, 
gray body radiation, gas radiation, and real body radiation. Prerequisite: 440-562 or 
equivalent. 



83 



400-738. Irreversible Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of processes which are inherently entropy producing. Development of 
general equations, theory of minimum rate of entropy production, mechanical 
processes, life processes, and astronomical processes. Prerequisite: 400-603 or equiva- 
lent. 

400-740. Machine Tool Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic Principles of single point and multiple point tools, materials, forces, velocities, 
and power requirements. Dies and punches; material and manufacture; die and 
assemblies design clearances; supports, stops and pilots, strippers and knockouts. 
General requirements of a machine tool; design principles of machine tools; stiffness 
and rigidity standarization of speeds and feeds; layout of speed change gears; design of 
some constructional elements. Prerequisite: 440-226 or equivalent. 

400-742. Mechanic Properties and Theories of Failure Credit 3(3-0) 

Static properties in tension and compression; stress and combined stresses; fatigue, 
impact, creep and temperature. Various theories of failure under the above loading 
conditions. Applications. Prerequisite: 440-336 or equivalent. 

400-744. Network Matrices and Graphs Credit 3(3-0) 

Use of vector space techniques in the description, analysis and realization of net- 
works modeled as matrices and graphs. The course investigates vector space concepts 
in the modeling and study of networks. The system concept of networks is introduced 
and explored as a dimensional space consideration in terms of matrices and graphs. 
Prerequisite: 420-400 or equivalent. 

400-746. Phase Equilibria Credit 3(3-0) 

Interpretation and Mathematical analysis of unary, binary and ternary, inorganic, 
phase equilibria systems with examples for solving practical materials science prob- 
lems; isoplethal and isothermal sections, and crystallization paths; thermodynamic 
fundamentals. Prerequisite: 227-408 or consent of instructor. 

400-749. Inventory Systems Analysis and Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Demand forecasting with emphasis on statistical techniques and smoothing. Inven- 
tory control system philosophy. Study of deterministic and probabilistic inventory 
systems. Use of lagrange multipliers, dynamic programming and queueing in inven- 
tory control. Introduction to queueing theory. Prerequisite: IE 530 or consent of 
instructor. 

400-752. Solid State Technology Lab Techniques II 

Credit Variable (1-3) 

Lectures and experiments in semiconductor device fabrication processes. Crystal 
growth, expitaxial techniques, impurity diffusion, Schottky barriers, and ohmic con- 
tacts. Diode, Transistor, integrated circuit and solar cell structures will be studied. 
Prerequisite: 400-680 or consent of instructor. 

400-755. Plastic Analysis and Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Behavior of structural steel beyond the elastic limit. Ultimate load theory, the 
analysis and design of steel-framed structures and components. Strength and 
behavior of structures stressed in the plastic range. Prerequisite: 410-457 and 410-461 
or equivalent. 

400-757. Physical Metallurgy of Industrial Alloys Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of principles of alloying and heat treatment and their application to com- 

84 



mercially important alloy systems. Principles of corrosion. Prerequisite: 440-226 and 
440-560 or equivalent. 

400-759. Prestressed Concrete Theory and Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and methods of design for prestressed concrete structures. Material and con- 
struction techniques, ultimate-strength design. Prerequisite: 410-455 or equivalent. 

400-761. Statistical Communication Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Statistical theory of signal transmission. Markov chain processes and systems, in- 
formation measures, channel capacity, and coding theorems. Detection and extraction 
of signals in noise background based on statistical decision theory. Prerequisite: 400- 
612. 

400-762. Advanced Thermodynamics and Mass Transport Credit 3(3-0) 

Thermodynamic laws and functions and their relation to problems of materials 
science; diffusion theory and its application; survey of principles of phase trans- 
formations; nucleation and growth; the discussion of diffusion and phase transforma- 
tions are extended and applied to real systems. Prerequisite: 227-408 or consent of 
instructor. 

400-763. Computer-Aided Network Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Common techniques used in making design or networks easier by computers. Covers 
user-written programs, modeling, libraries, optimization, sensitivity. Design by 
means of a system will be emphasized. Prerequisite: 420-400 and 400-620. 

400-765. Digital Signal Processing II Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of Digital Signal Processing I. Homomorphic filtering, simulation of 
dynamical systems, random functions, correlation and power spectra will also be 
covered. Prerequisite: 400-630 or consent of instructor. 

400-767. Structural Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of structures subjected to dynamic loading. Formulation of mass-lumped 
and consistent, stiffness and damping matrices. Equivalent structural damping and 
elastic-plastic effects on response. Prerequisite: 400-644 or equivalent. 

400-772. Theory and Design of Digital Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Digital system concepts of language models, algorithms, manipulative schemes, in- 
formation structures, and pulse networks. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

400-774. Theories of Manufacturing Processes Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of metal cutting and forming, material behavior characteristics related to 
cutting and forming. Metal cutting analysis, mechanics of chip formation, thermal 
aspects of cutting, prediction of tool wear and tool life. Metal forming analysis, hot- 
working and cold-working, upper and lower bound solutions, slip line theory, plane 
strain. Applications to rolling, forging, wire drawing, extrusion, deep drawing and 
bending. Prerequisite: 440-226 or equivalent. 

400-776. Theory of Plasticity Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts of plastic deformation, trusses and beams; plane shear theory; ax- 
ially symmetric problems; torsion, limit analysis, and extremum principles. Pre- 
requisite: 400-762 or equivalent. 

400-777. Thesis Credit Variable (1-6) 



85 



400-778. Theory of Vibrations Credit 3(3-0) 

Vibration analysis of systems with one, two, or multi-degrees of freedom. In- 
strumentation, continuous systems, computer techniques. Prerequisite: 440-566 or 
equivalent. 

400-779. Advanced Structural Steel Design Credit 3(2-2) 

Modern methods and advanced theory applied to the design of steel structures. Pro- 
ject design includes the solution to various types of framed structures. Prerequisite: 
410-457 and 410-563 or equivalent. 

400-788. Research Credit Variable (1-3) 

Advanced research in an area of interest to student and instructor. 

400-789. Special Topics Credit Variable (1-3) 

Study of advanced topics selected prior to the offering and pertinent to student's 
programs of study. 



ENGLISH 

Jimmy L. Williams, Chairperson 

Office: 202 Crosby Hall 

The Department of English offers a concentration of studies for persons seeking to 
improve their knowledge of English and American literature and language and for 
individuals seeking a Master of Arts in English and Afro American Literature and a 
Master of Science in Education with concentration in English. 

Requirements for Admission to the Master of Arts Program in English and 
Afro-American Literature 

All applicants to the M.A. program must have earned a bachelor's degree from a 
four-year college. Applicants must also have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
(24) undergraduate hours in English. Application forms may be obtained from the 
office of the Graduate School or the English Department and must be completed and 
returned to the Graduate Office. Two (2) official transcripts of previous undergrad- 
uate or graduate records and three (3) letters of recommendation must be forwarded 
to the Graduate Office before action can be taken on the application. An applicant may 
be admitted to the program unconditionally, provisionally, or as a special student. 

Unconditional Admission. To qualify for unconditional admission to the M.A. 
program, an applicant must have earned an overall average of 3.00 on a four-point 
system (or 2.00 on a three-point system) in undergraduate studies. 

Provisional Admission. An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies on a pro- 
visional basis if (1) the record of undergraduate preparation reveals deficiencies that 
can be removed near the beginning of graduate study or (2) lacking the required grade 
point average for unconditional admission, the applicant may become eligible by 
successfully completing the first nine (9) hours of course work with a 3.00 or better 
average. A student provisionally admitted may also be required to pass examinations 
to demonstrate his knowledge in certain areas or to take special undergraduate 
courses to improve his background. 

Special Students. Students not seeking the M.A. degree may be admitted in order to 
take courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificates. If the 
student subsequently wishes to pursue the M.A. program, he or she must request an 
evaluation of the work. Under no circumstances may the student apply toward a 
degree program more than twelve (12) hours earned as a special student. 



86 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Total Hours Required. The M.A. program consists of two distinct and parallel 
elements. The student may elect to take twenty-four (24) hours of course work and 
write a thesis for six (6) hours credit in order to satisfy the thirty-hour minimum 
requirement. The student may also elect not to write a thesis and take an additional 
six (6) hours of course work in order to satisfy the thirty-hour minimum requirement. 
Three courses are required: English 754 — History and Structure of the English 
Language, English 753 — Literary Research and Bibliography, and English 700— 
Literary Analysis and Criticism. The student must take a minimum of twelve (12) 
hours and no more than a maximum of fifteen (15) hours in Afro-American 
Literature. 

Approximately fifty percent of the courses offered each semester will be open only 
to graduate students. These courses are on the 700 level. All 600 level courses will be 
open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Grades Required. Students in the M.A. program must maintain a 3.00 average in 
order to satisfy the grade requirements of the program. If a student receives a C or 
lower in more than two (2) courses, he or she will be dropped from the program. 

Amount of Credit Accepted for Transfer. The Graduate School will accept six (6) 
semester hours of transfer credit from another institution for those students enrolled 
in degree programs. 

Other Requirements (Comprehensive and Thesis Examinations). Students must 
pass a three (3) hour written comprehensive examination administered by the English 
Department. The comprehensive examination will cover only material to which the 
student has been exposed in course work at A. and T. The comprehensive may be taken 
twice. Those students who elect to write a thesis must meet the deadlines projected by 
the Graduate School in addition to standing a one-hour oral examination which 
constitutes a defense of the thesis. The defense may be attempted twice. 

Language and/or Research Tool Requirements. A student wishing to pursue the 
M.A. program must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language by passing a one- 
hour written examination to be administered by the Foreign Language Department of 
A. and T. The Princeton Foreign Language Examination (ETS) may also be used to 
satisfy the language requirement. Students failing to pass the proficiency 
examination after two attempts must enroll in the appropriate intermediate level 
courses and earn a grade of at least "B". In addition to the traditional languages which 
satisfy the departmental requirements (e.g., French, German and Spanish), qualified 
students may elect to substitute a language related to Afro-American literature (e.g., 
Swahili). Foreign students may also elect to substitute English to meet the language 
requirement. 

Requirements for Admission to the Master of Science Degree in Education 
with Concentration in English 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
programs in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the Master 
of Science in Education with concentration in English must have earned the following 
in undergraduate studies: Twenty-four (24) semester hours in English courses above 
freshman composition. The hours must include at least three semester hours of 
Shakespeare, three of American literature, three of English literature, three of world 
literature or contemporary literature, and three of advanced grammar and 
composition. 

A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to satisfy the re- 
quirements by enrolling in undergraduate courses before beginning graduate studies 
in English. Except for the foreign language requirement, the admission requirements 



87 



are the same for the M.S. in Education — English as they are for the M.A. in English 
and Afro-American Literature. 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. English 700, 754, 770 

2. 15 semester hours selected from the following: English 603, 620, 628, 702, 704, 

750, 751, 752, 755 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. English 700, 754, 770 

2. 12 semester hours selected from the following: 620, 628, 629, 702, 704, 720, 750, 

751, 752, 755. 

3. Thesis Research: 3 semester hours. 



ENGLISH 

Jimmy L. Williams, Chairperson 

Office: 202 Crosby Hall 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

212-603. Introduction to Folklore 

(Formerly 2498) 

Basic introduction to the study and appreciation of folklore. (Cross listed as Anthro- 
pology 603). 

212-620. Elizabethan Drama Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2491) 

Chief Elizabethan plays. Tracing the development of dramatic forms from early 
works to the close of the theaters in 1642. Prerequisite: English 220 and 221; 210. 

212-621. Grammar and Composition for Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2972) 

A course designed to provide a review of the fundamentals of grammar and 
composition for the elementary or secondary school teacher. (Not accepted for credit 
toward undergraduate or graduate concentration in English.) 

212-626. Children's Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the types of literature designed for students from kindergarten through 
elementary school. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or English 101, Humanities 200- 
201. 

212-627. Literature for Adolescents Credit 3(3-0) 

A course to acquaint prospective and inservice teachers with a wide variety of good 
literature that is of interest to adolescents. Emphasis on thematic approach to the 
study of literature, bibliotherapy, continental writers, book selection, and motivating 
students to read widely and independently with depth and understanding. Prerequi- 
sites: English 101, 200, and 201 or graduate standing. 

212-628. The American Novel Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2978) 



88 



A history of the American novel from Cooper to Faulkner; Melville, Twain, Howells, 
James, Dreiser, Lewis, Hawthorne, Faulkner, Hemingway will be included. Prerequi- 
site: English 210 or 700. 

212-639. Media Internship Credit 6(1-0) 

On-the-job training with local news gathering organization; and a critical analysis 
of a contemporary problem. Prerequisites: English 455 and 456 or 457. 

212-640. Writing and Announcing for TV-Radio Credit 3(2-2) 

Techniques and practices of editing and preparing local and wire news copy for 
radio and television news broadcasts; laboratory practice in preparation of same for 
actual broadcasting. Prerequisites: English 455 and 456 or 457. 

212-641. Public Information and Public Relations Techniques Credit 3(3-0) 

Publicity methods are employed by educational institutions, federal agencies and 
private industries; how to communicate through newspapers, magazines, radio- 
television stations and other media. Prerequisite: English 455 or graduate standing. 

212-650. Afro-American Folklore Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of folk tales, ballads, riddles, proverbs, superstitions and folk songs of black 
Americans. Parallels will be drawn between folklore peculiar to black Americans and 
that of Africa, the Carribean, and other nationalities. 

212-652. Afro-American Drama Credit 3(3-0) 

A detailed study of the dramatic theory and practice of black American writers 
against the backdrop of Continental and American trends. Special attention will be 
given to the works of major figures from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. 
Works by Bontemps, Cullen, Hughes, Hansberry, Ward, Davis, Baldwin, Baraka 
(Jones), Gordone, and Bullins will be included. 

212-654. Afro-American Novel I Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by major 
black writers through 1940. Novelists emphasized include Dunbar, Chesnutt, Toomer, 
McKay, Larsen, Hurston, Griggs, Fauset, and Wright. 

212-656. Afro-American Novel II Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by major 
black writers after 1940. Novelists emphasized include Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, 
Himes, Demby, Williams, Walker, Brooks, Petry, Gaines, and Mayfield. 

212-658. Afro-American Poetry I Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive study of Afro-American poetry from its beginning to 1940 with special 
attention given to poets of the Harlem Renaissance. Poets to be studied include Terry, 
Hammon, Wheatley, A. A. Whitman, Horton, Braithwaite, J. W. Johnson, Home, 
Fenton Johnson, Georgia Douglas Johnson, McKay, Cullen, Cuney, and Hughes. 

212-660. Afro-American Poetry II Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive study of Afro-American poetry from 1940 to the present with con- 
siderable attention given to the revolutionary poets of the sixties and seventies. Poets 
to be studied include Hughes, Walker, F. M. Davis, Brooks, Brown, Hayden, Tolson, 
Lee, Reed, Giovanni, Angelou, Jeffers, Sanchez, Redmond, Fabio, Fields, and Jones. 



89 



212-662. History of American Ideas Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of major ideas which have animated American thought from the beginning 
to the present. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. 

212-700. Literary Analysis and Criticism Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2485) 

An introduction to intensive textual analysis of poetry, prose fiction, prose non- 
fiction, and drama. A study of basic principles and practices in literary criticism and 
of the various schools of criticism from Plato to Eliot. 

212-702. Milton Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2486) 

A study of the works of Milton in relation to the cultural and literary trends of 
seventeenth-century England. Emphasis is placed upon Milton's poetry. 

212-704. Eighteenth Century English Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2487) 
A study of the major prose and poetry writers of the eighteenth century in relation 
to the cultural and literary trends. Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Fielding, Addison, Pope, 
Johnson, and Blake will be included. 

212-710. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2488) 

A course designed to provide elementary school teachers with an opportunity to 
discuss problems related to the language arts taught in the elementary school. (Not ac- 
cepted for credit towards concentration in English.) 

212-711. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers II Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 711) 
A continuation of the study of relevant language situations with which elementary 
teachers should be concerned. Emphasis will be placed on strategies for guiding pupils 
to explore the nature and structure of language and for teaching essential language 
skills. (Not accepted for credit towards concentration in English.) 

212-720. Studies in American Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2489) 

A study of major American prose and poetry writers. 

212-749. Romantic Prose and Poetry of England Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2490) 

A study of nineteenth-century British authors whose works reveal characteristics of 
Romanticism, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Lamb, Carlyle, and De 
Quincey will be included. 

212-750. Victorian Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of nineteenth-century Victorian writing, including poetry, fiction, and non- 
fictional prose. Among the writers to be considered will be Tennyson, Browning, 
Arnold, Rossetti, Carlyle, Mill, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, Thackeray, and Hardy. 

212-751. Modern British and Continental Fiction Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2491) 



90 



A study of British and European novelists from 1914 until the present. Included in 
the study are Joyce, Kafka, Gide, Mann, and Camus. 

212-752. Restoration and 18th Century Drama Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2492) 

A study of the theatre and drama in relation to the cultural trends of the period. 
Etherege, Farquhar, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Fielding, Gay, Steele, Goldsmith, and 
Sheridan will be included. 

212-753. Literary Research and Bibliography Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2943) 
An introduction to tools and techniques used in investigation of literary subjects. 

212-754. History and Structure of the English Language Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2494) 

A study of the changes in the English language-syntax, vocabulary, spelling, pro- 
nunciation, and usage from the fourteenth century through the twentieth century. 

212-755. Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rhetoric Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2495) 

A course designed to provide secondary teachers of English with experiences in 
Linguistics applied to modern grammar and composition. 

212-760. Non-fiction by Afro-American Writers Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of non-fiction by black writers including slave narratives, autobiographies, 
biographies, essays, letters and orations. 

212-762. Short Fiction by Afro-American Writers Credit 3(3-0) 

An extensive examination of short fiction by Afro-American writers. Among those 
included are Chesnutt, Dunbar, Toomer, Hurston, McKay, Hughes, Bontemps, 
Wright, Clarke, Ellison, Fair, Alice Walker, Ron Milner, Julia Fields, Jean W. Smith, 
Petry, Baldwin, Kelley, and Jones. 

212-764. Black Aesthetics Credit 3(3-0) 

A definition of those qualities of black American literature which distinguish it 
from traditional American literature through an analysis of theme, form, and tech- 
nique as they appear in a representative sample of works by black writers. 

212-766. Seminar in Afro-American Literature and 

Language Credit 3(3-0) 

A topics course which will vary; focus will be on prominent themes and/or subjects 
treated by Afro-American writers from the beginning to the present. An attempt will 
be made to characterize systematically the idiom (modes of expression, style) of Afro- 
American Writers. 

212-770. Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2499) 
Provides an opportunity for presentation and discussion of thesis, as well as select- 
ed library or original research projects from non-thesis candidates. Prerequisite: 15 
hours of graduate-level courses in English. 

212-775. Thesis Research Credit 3(3-0) 



91 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 
Roy D. Moore, Chairperson 
Office: Moore Gymnasium 

The Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation offers a Master of 
Science degree in Education with a concentration in Physical Education. 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
programs in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate must hold or 
be qualified to hold a Class A teaching certificate in Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

Requirements for a Degree 

Non-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Physical Education 785, 786, and 798 

2. 9 s.h. in Physical Education Courses 

3. 6 s.h. in Electives 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Physical Education 785, 786, 798, and 799 

2. 6 additional s.h. in Physical Education Courses 

3. 6 s.h. in electives 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

330-651. Personal, School and Community Health Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of personal, school and community health problems and resources. 
Emphasis is placed on the control of communicable diseases, healthful school living 
and the development in individuals of the scientific attitude and a positive philosophy 
of healthful living. 

330-652. Methods and Materials in Health Education for Elementary and 

Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the fundamentals of the school health program, pupil needs, methods, 
planning, instruction teaching techniques, selection and evaluation of materials for 
the elementary and secondary programs, and the use of the community resources. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

330-655. Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A practical course for experienced teachers. Consideration given to individual prob- 
lems in physical education with analysis of present trends. 

330-656. Administration of Interscholastic and Intramural 

Athletics Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the relation of athletics to education, and the problems of finance, 
facilities, scheduling, eligibility, and insurance. Consideration given to the organiza- 
tion and administration of intramural activities in the school program. 

92 



330-657. Community Recreation Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of recreational facilities and problems with consideration being given to the 
promotion of effective recreational programs in rural and urban communities. 

330-658. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports. Credit 3(3-0) 

Methodology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasis is placed on seasonal 
activity. 

330-669. Physiology of Exercise Credit 3(2-2) 

The purpose of this course is to observe and record the effects of physical activity on 
the organic systems and service organs of the human body and to learn basic labora- 
tory techniques and procedures of physical education. 

330-679. Prescribed Methods of Rehabilitating The Physically 

Handicapped Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to train the student in the use of therapeutic exercise as it 
applies to physical rehabilitation of the physically handicapped. There will be discus- 
sions and laboratory practice of physiological and kinesiological principles of physical 
restoration. 

For Graduates Only 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

330-780. Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation in Elementary Schools Credit 3(3-0) 

This course studies the modern developments in methods and materials of elemen- 
tary school physical education. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

330-785. Research in Health, Physical Education and 

Recreation Credit 3(3-0) 

A course that is designed to study the various methods of investigating and princi- 
ples underlying the work in the field of health, physical education and recreation. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of the instructor. 

330-786. Scientific Foundations of Physical Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to discuss scientific approaches to physical education and 
methods of applying these scientific investigations to the classroom. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

330-787. Scientific Foundations of Physical Fitness Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the concepts of physical fitness and the application of these concepts to 
school and community programs. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. 

330-798. Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

A course of study in which the research projects are prepared, discussed, and evalu- 
ated by the facultv and students. 



HISTORY 

Frank C. Bell, Chairperson 

Office: 318 Hodgin Hall 

The Department of History offers a Master of Science degree in Education with con- 
centration in History or Social Science. 

93 



Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
program in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree 
of Master of Science in Education with a concentration in History of Social Sciences 
must hold or be qualified to hold a Class A teaching certificate in History of Social 
Sciences. A graduate student seeking certification for teaching history or the social 
sciences must complete a graduate course in methods of teaching the social sciences. 

Requirements for the Degree 

To complete the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Education with 
a concentration in History or Social Science, the student may elect the thesis option or 
the non-thesis option. 

HISTORY 

Non-thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 21 semester hours in history (Political Science 645 and Political Science 730 are 
accepted for history credit). 

2. 6 semester hours in education (Education 701 or 625 or 703 and Education 720 or 
722 or Psychology 726). 

3. 3 semester hours in electives 

Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above including the 
thesis. 

1. 15 semester hours in history 

2. 6 semester hours in education (Education 701 or 625 or 703 and Education 720 or 
722 or Psychology 726) 

3. 6 semester hours thesis 

4. 3 semester hours in electives 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Non-thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 21 semester hours in social science courses. 

2. 6 semester hours in education (Education 701 or 625 or 703 and Education 720 or 
722 or Psychology 726) 

3. 3 semester hours in electives 

Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above including the 
thesis. 

1. 15 semester hours in social science courses 

2. 6 semester hours in education (Education 701 or 625 or 703 and Education 720 or 
722 or Psychology 726) 

3. 6 semester hours thesis 

4. 3 semester hours in electives 

HISTORY 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

600. The British Colonies and the American Revolution Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive analysis of special problems in Colonial and Revolutionary America. 



94 



603. The Civil War and Reconstruction Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with a summary of the Civil War, then treats the historiography 
of the Reconstruction Period, the Reconstruction of the South, and the restoration of 
the Union. 

605. Seminar on the Soviet Union Credit 3(3-0) 
A seminar course on the Soviet Union including extensive reading and discussion 

and a major research paper. 

606. United States History, 1900-1932 Credit 3(3-0) 
This course traces the political, economic, and social forces operating in the 

United States and their effect upon the people. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
Progressive Movement, World War I, and the Great Depression. 

607. United States History, 1932-Present Credit 3(3-0) 

(A continuation of History 606) 
Emphasis will be placed upon the New Deal, World War II, and the Social Revolu- 
tion in the 1960's. 

615. Seminar in the History of Black America Credit 3(3-0) 
A reading, research, and discussion course which concentrates attention on various 

aspects of the life and history of Afro-Americans. 

616. Seminar in African History Credit 3(3-0) 
Research, writing and discussion on selected topics in African history. 

617. Readings in African History Credit 3(3-0) 
By arrangement with instructor. 

625. Seminar in Historiography and Historical Method Credit 3(3-0) 
The study of the writing of history as well as training in research methodology and 

communication. 

626. Revolution in the Modern World Credit 3(3-0) 
A comparative study of revolutionary movements and outbreaks with special 

emphasis on the French, Russian, and Chinese Revolutions plus an evaluation of 
theories of revolution in light of historical examples. 

630. Studies in European History, 1815-1914 Credit 3(3-0) 
Intensive study of selected topics in Nineteenth Century European history. 

631. Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, 1914 to 

the Present Credit 3(3-0) 

Reading course in contemporary European history since 1914. 

633. Independent Study in History Credit (1-3) 

By arrangement. 

*645. American Foreign Policy— 1945 to Present Credit 3(3-0) 

Examination of forces and policies that have emerged from Potsdam, Yalta, and 
World War II. Emphasis will be on understanding the policies that were formulated, 
why they were formulated, the consequences of their formulation, and the alternative 
policies that may have come about. Prerequisites: Survey course in American history, 
American Diplomatic history or consent of instructor. 

*Political Science 645 is accepted for history credit. 

95 



Courses for Graduates Only 
701. Recent United States Diplomatic History Credit 3(3-0) 

712. The Black American in the Twentieth Century Credit 3(3-0) 

730. Seminar in History Credit 3(3-0) 

*730. Constitutional Development Since 1865 Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical study of the development of the Constitution since 1865. Treatment will 
be given to important Constitutional decisions, major documents, major Supreme 
Court decisions, and public policy. Assignments in paperback books will be frequent. 

740. History, Social Sciences, and Contemporary 

World Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Readings, discussions, and reports on the relationships between history and the 
social sciences as a whole as their combined role in dealing with contemporary world 
problems. 

750. Thesis in History Credit (3-6) 

Thesis work will be done with the appropriate instructor in accordance with field of 
interest. 

**725. Problems and Trends in Teaching the Social 

Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

Current strategies, methods, and materials for teaching the social sciences. 
Emphasis on innovations, evaluation and relation to learning. Provision for clinical 
experiences. 

*Political Science 730 is accepted for history credit. 
**Education 725 is required for graduate students seeking certification in the social 
sciences. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

233-608. Culture and Value Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 5970) 

A critical study of the nature and justification of basic ethical concepts in light of 
historical thought. 

233-609. Contemporary Philosophy Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 5971) 

A critical investigation of some contemporary movements in philosophy with 
special emphasis on existentialism, pragmatism, and positivism. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

233-640. Topics in Geography of Anglo-America Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 610) 
Selected topics in cultural geography of the United States and Canada are studied 

96 



intensively. Emphasis is placed upon individual reading and research and upon group 
discussion. 

233-641. Topics in World Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 720) 

Selected topics in world geography are studied intensively. Concern is for cultural 
characteristics and their interrelationships with each other and with habitat. 
Emphasis is upon reading, research and discussion. 

233-650. Physical Geography I Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 605) 

A study of the surface of the earth, including means of representation of the earth's 
surface, physical elements of weather and climate, climatic regions, and the earth's 
waters and elements. 

233-651. Physical Geography II Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 606) 

A continuation of Physical Geography I concentrating on climate and weather, 
natural vegetation and animal life, soils and association of physical landscape 
attributes. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Harold E. Mazyck, Chairperson 

Office: Benbow Hall 

The Department of Home Economics offers a program leading to the Master of 
Science degree as listed earlier in this catalog in the description of degree programs. 

The department also offers courses for individuals desiring advanced study in child 
development, clothing, textiles and related arts, home economics education, food ad- 
ministration, and for those seeking renewal of teaching certificates. 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 
170-630. Advanced Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Intermediate metabolism and interrelationships of organic and inorganic food 
nutrients in human biochemical functions. Prerequisites: Home Economics 337 and 
Chemistry 251, 252 or equivalent. 

170-631. Advanced Food Science Credit 3(2-2) 

Advanced discussion and experimentation with the chemical and physical changes 
of food during processing and storage. Prerequisite: Home Economics 436 or equiva- 
lent. 

170-632. Food and Nutrition in Early Childhood Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the elementary principles of nutrition and their influence on the growth 
and development of children. Special consideration is given to nutrition education 
techniques to be used with children and parents in pre-school centers and elementary 
schools. 

170-635. Introduction to Research Methods in Food 

and Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory experiences in the use of methods applicable to food and nutrition 
research. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. 

97 



170-636. Food Promotion Credit 4(1-6) 

A course which gives experiences in the development and testing of recipes. Oppor- 
tunities will be provided for demonstrations, writing and photography with selected 
businesses. 

170-637. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

Individualized research on a selected problem in food or nutrition. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 635. 

For Graduate Students Only 
170-730. Nutrition in Health and Disease Credit 5(3-4) 

Significance of nutrition in health and disease. Consideration of: (1) the methods of 
appraisal of human nutritional status to include clinical, dietary, biochemical, and 
anthropometric techniques, (2) various biochemical parameters used to diagnose and 
treatment of the disorders, and (3) the role of diet as a therapeutic tool. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 630 or equivalent. 

170-733. Nutrition During Growth and Development Credit 3(2-2) 

Nutritional, genetical and environmental influences on human growth and develop- 
ment. Prerequisite: Home Economics 630 or equivalent. 

170-734. Nutrition Education Credit 3(2-2) 

Interpretation of human nutrition research findings for use in the development of 
course content and instructional media for nutrition education. Consideration will be 
given to adapting materials for variations in age, education and socio-econo levels. 

170-735. Experimental Food Science. Credit 4(1-6) 

Experimental approach to the study of food preparation quality, deterioration, and 
safety. Prerequisite: H.Ec. 436 or equivalent. 

170-736. Research Methods in Food and Nutrition. Credit 4(1-8) 

Theoretical consideration of techniques used in human metabolism study; retention 
and requirements of nutrients. Critical analysis of the methods used in surveys of 
nutritional status study. Advanced analytical, biological and microbiological tech- 
niques used in food and nutrition research, conduct animal experiments and analysis 
of food and biological materials. Prerequisite: F&N 635 and Statistics. 

170-738. Food Testing and Evaluation Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of factors affecting the color, flavor, odor and texture of foods through the 
use of subjective and objective testing methods. Prerequisite: H.Ec. 436 or equivalent. 

170-739. Thesis Research Credit 3(0-6) 

Research problems in food or nutrition. 

170-740. Community Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

(Individualized work or team teaching or guest speakers?) 

Application of the principles of nutrition to various community nutrition problems 
of specific groups (geriatrics, preschoolers, adolescents and expectant mothers). 
Evaluation of nutrition programs of public health and social welfare agencies at local, 
state, federal and international levels. 

170-741. Current Trends in Food Science Credit 3(3-0) 

Recent developments in food science and their implications for teachers, nutrition- 
ists, extension workers, and dietitions. 

98 



170-742. Cultural and Social Aspects of Food and Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 

Sociological, psychological, and economical background of ethnic groups and their 
influence on food consumption patterns, and nutritional status. 

170-743. Food Preservation Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of current methods of preserving foods— canning, freezing, dehydration, 
radiation and fermentation. Prerequisite: H.Ec. 436 or equivalent. 

170-744. Seminar in Food & Nutrition Credit 2(2-0) 

(Required of all graduates in Food and Nutrition) Lecture and discussion by faculty, 
students, and guests. 

170-745. Practicum in Food or Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

Field experiences with private and public agencies. 

170-746. Internship in Home Economics Education Credit 6(0-12) 

Internship in Home Economics Education is required of any person who has not had 
previous teaching experience. Internship must include an extended period of involve- 
ment in a school's program during a regular school term. Internship will provide op- 
portunity for participation in the total school program including, curriculum, work 
with teachers, administrators, students and parents. This experience will serve as an 
equivalent of or facsimile of student teaching experience. 

170-624. Advanced Textiles Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly C.T.R.A. 1872) 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of textile fibers and fabrics with 
emphasis on recent scientific and technological developments. 

170-625. Experimental Clothing and Textiles Credit 3(1-4) 

Experimentation with new woven fabrics and non-textiles such as furs, leathers, 
and suedes. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

170-603. Special Problems in Home Economics I Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly H.Ec. 1974) 

Problems in the various areas of Home Economics with implications for secondary 
teaching may be chosen for individual study. 

170-604. Seminar in Home Economics Education Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly H.Ec. 1974) 
Consideration of problems resulting from the impact of social change on the various 
fields of Home Economics in relation to the secondary school vocational homemaking 
programs. 

FOOD ADMINISTRATION 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

170-645. Special Problems in Food Administration Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly I.M. 1975) 
Individual work on special problems in food administration. 

170-646. Readings in Food Administration Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly I.M. 1976) 

99 



A study of food administration through reports and discussion of articles in current 
trade periodicals and scientific journals. 

170-647. Seminar in Food Administration Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly I.M. 1977) 

Discussion of problems involved in the organization and management of specialized 
food service areas. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Graduate 

170-706. Special Problems in Home Economics II Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly H.Ec. 1986) 

A study of research and major contemporary issues with consideration of their im- 
pact on trends and new directions in home economics. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

170-612. Senior Seminar 

(Formerly CD 1972) 

A review of recent research findings and discussion of current trends and informa- 
tion related to young children. Concurrent with Education 558. 

Graduate 

170-715. Special Problems in Child Development Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1985) 

Opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups on child develop- 
ment problems of special interest. Work may represent either survey of a given field 
or intensive investigation of a particular problem. The student should consult the in- 
structor before registering for this course. 

CLOTHING, TEXTILES, AND RELATED ARTS 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

170-620. Fashion Coordination Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly C.T.R.A. 1870) 

A study of the factors which influence the fashion world; trends, designers, centers 
and promotion. Field trips to fashion centers. 

170-621. Seminar in Clothing, Textiles and Related Art Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly C.T.R.A. 1871) 

A study of current trends in the field of Clothing, Textiles, and Related Art. 

170-622. Economics of Clothing and Textiles Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly C.T.R.A. 1872) 

A study of the economic aspects of clothing and household textiles as they relate to 
family needs and resources in their quest for maximum satisfaction and serviceabil- 
ity. 

170-623. Textile Chemistry Credit 3(1-4) 

An introduction to the chemistry of the major classes of natural and manmade 
fibers, including their structure, properties, and reactions. Laboratory work will in- 

100 



elude consideration of chemical damage to fabrics, finishes, and dyes. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 104 and 105, Textiles 123. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

George C. Gail, Chairperson 

Office: Price 105 

For admission to the degree and for requirements, see the degree programs listed 
previously in the catalogue. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 
361-616. Plastic Craft Credit 3(2-2) 

For teachers of industrial arts, arts and crafts and those interested in plastics as a 
hobby. Operations in plastics analyzed and demonstrated; design, color, kinds, and 
uses of plastics, how plastics are made and sold vocational information. Projects 
suitable for class use constructed. 

361-617. General Crafts Credit 3(2-2) 

Principles and techniques of crafts used in school activity programs. Emphasis is on 
materials, tools and processes used in elementary schools and industrial art courses. 
Open to all persons interested in craft instruction for professional or non-professional 
use. 

361-618. Elementary School Industrial Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

Aims, content, equipment and methods utilized in programs designed to integrate 
K-6 elementary school activities with the study of industry and technology. 

361-619. World of Construction Credit 3(2-2) 

Industrial Arts Curriculum Project Workshop encompassing rational, strategies, 
techniques and media. Prerequisite for middle grade teachers initiating course in the 
"World of Construction" or "World of Manufacturing." 

361-620. World of Manufacturing Credit 3(2-2) 

(See 619 course description) 

361-630. Photography and Educational Media Credit 3(2-1) 

Nomenclature, operation and maintenance of various still and motion picture 
cameras. The use of exposure meters— film processing — contact printing— slide 
preparation— film editing — copying— enlarging— preparation and storage of chemical 
solutions — print spotting — dry mounting. 

361-635. Graphic Arts Credit 3(2-2) 

Fundamentals of typography, hand composition, press operation, block printing, 
screen printing, offset lithography, other reproduction methods, and bookbinding. 

361-660. Industrial Cooperative Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

For prospective teachers of vocational education. Principles, organization and ad- 
ministration of industrial cooperative. 

361-661. Organization of Related Study Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of scheduling and planning pupil's course and work experience; selecting 

101 



and organizing related instructional materials in I.C.T. programs. Prerequisite: I.E. 
660 

361-662. Industrial Course Construction Credit 3(3-0) 

Selecting, organizing and integrating objectives, content, media and materials ap- 
propriate to industrial courses. Strategies and techniques of designing and im- 
plementing group and individual teaching-learning activities to develop interest 
awareness or specialization. Prerequisites: IE 462, 463, 465. 

361-663. History and Philosophy of Industrial 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Chronological and philosophical development of industrial education with special 
emphasis on its growth and function in American schools. 

361-664. Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed for persons who teach or plan to teach middle grades occupational explora- 
tion programs. Emphasis will be placed on occupational exploration in the curriculum, 
sources and uses of occupational information, approaches to middle grades teaching, 
and philosophy and concepts of occupational education. 

Graduate Courses 
361-715. Comprehensive General Shop Credit 3(2-2) 

Problems involving wood, electricity-electronics, graphic arts, metal and crafts; 
emphasis on organization, instructional materials and procedures. 

361-717. Industrial Education Problems I Credit 3(2-2) 

An advanced study in modern technology, may deal with recent developments, 
trends, practices and procedures of manufacturing and construction industries. In- 
dividual and group research and experimentation, involving selection, design, develop- 
ment and evaluation of technical reports and instructional materials for application in 
Industrial Education program. Prerequisite: 510 or 715. 

361-718. Industrial Education Problems II Credit 3(2-2) 

Continuation of 717. 

361-719. Advanced Furniture Design and Construction Credit 3(2-2) 

Laws, theories and principles of aesthetic and structural design, planning, design- 
ing, pictoral sketching and furniture drawing. Laboratory work involving setting up, 
operating, and maintaining furniture production equipment, plus firms, requisitions, 
orders, invoices, stock, bills, buying and professional problems. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion from instructor. 

361-731. Advanced Drafting Techniques Credit 3(2-2) 

For teachers with undergraduate preparation or trade experience. School of tech- 
niques, standards, conventions, devices, experimentation in advance of opportunities 
offered in regular courses. Use of literature and research expected. 

361-762. Construction and Use of Instructional Aids Credit 3(2-2) 

The analysis of various instructional aids useful in shop teaching, planning, design- 
ing, and construction of various teaching aids. Facilities for laboratory work provided. 

361-763. General Industrial Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the development of local, state, and national levels of day industrial 



102 



schools, evening industrial schools, part-time day and evening schools. Their organ- 
izations, types, courses of study, scope of movement; study of special student groups, 
fees, and charges, building and equipment. 

361-764. Supervision and Administration of Industrial Education 

A study of the relation of industrial education to the general curriculum and the ad- 
ministration responsibilities involved. Courses of study, relative costs, coordination 
problems, class and shop organization, and the development of an effective program of 
supervision will be emphasized. 

361-765. Evaluation in Industrial Subjects Credit 2(3-0) 

Study and application of principles of achievement test construction to industrial 
subjects; evaluation of results. 

361-766. Curriculum Laboratory in Industrial Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and preparation of instructional materials for classroom use. Students 
select and develop significant areas of instruction for use in industrial courses. 
Courses of study that function in teaching situations are prepared. Opportunity of- 
fered to analyze existing courses of study. 

361-767. Research and Literature in Industrial 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Research techniques applied to technical and educational papers and thesis; classi- 
fication of research, selection, delineation and planning; collection, organization and 
interpretation of data; survey of industrial education literature. 

361-768. Industrial Education Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed to enable non-thesis graduate majors to complete educational and techni- 
cal investigations. Each student will be expected to plan and complete a research 
paper and present a summary of his findings to the seminar. 

361-769. Thesis Research in Industrial Education Credit 3 



INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Arlington Chisman, Chairperson 

Office: Price 114 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

363-651. Power Industries and Technology Credit 3(2-2) 

Significance of modern power sources in Industrial Technology. Design and 
operating principles of steam, water hydraulic, pneumatic, internal and external com- 
bustion units. Nuclear, hydro-electric, gasoline, diesel, turbine rocket, jet, fuel cells, 
solar energy and other systems. Laboratory experiences involving utilization of power 
equipment, testing and servicing, with major emphasis on portable power plants. 

363-673. Advanced General Metals I Credit 3(2-2) 

A course in metalwork for teachers of industrial arts. Emphasis will center on art 
metal (including plating, finishing, etc.), advanced bench metal, sheet metal opera- 
tions and machine shop. Specifications for equipment, organization of instruction 
sheets, special problems and materials will be covered as well as shop organization. 
Prerequisite: I.T. 471. 



103 



363-674. Advanced General Metals II Credit 3(2-2) 

An advanced course in metalwork for the industrial arts teacher or other persons 
who may require more specialization in one area of metalwork. With the necessary 
prerequisites, the student may select any area of general metals for concentration and 
special study. Construction of projects, special assignments, etc., will be made after 
the area of work is selected and after consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: 
673. 

For Graduate Students Only 

363-735. Communications Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly LA. 3585) 

For teachers and prospective teachers of Industrial Arts. Emphasis placed on the 
selection and construction of projects useful in school shops, development of selected 
information. Theory and fundamentals of electronic navigation and communication, 
selecting equipment and supplies, course organization and instructional materials. 



MATHEMATICS 

Wendell P. Jones, Chairperson 

Office: Merrick Hall M101 

The Department of Mathematics offers two curricula leading to the Master of 
Science in Education. One is intended primarily for individuals preparing to teach 
mathematics in junior or senior high school. The second is intended for individuals 
preparing to teach mathematics in senior high school or junior college, or planning to 
continue with graduate studies leading to a doctorate in mathematics. 

Requirements for Admission to a Degree Program 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
programs in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the 
Master's degree program in Education with a concentration in Mathematics must 
have earned thrity (30) semester hours in mathematics including differential and in- 
tegral calculus and differential equations. A student who fails to meet these qualifica- 
tions will be expected to satisfy the requirements by enrolling in undergraduate 
courses before beginning his graduate studies in mathematics. 

Requirements for a Degree 

A student may not receive credit for a course which is equivalent to one for which he 
has received an undergraduate grade of "C" or above. 

JUNIOR HIGH-SENIOR HIGH CURRICULUM 

Non-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must satisfy the following: 

1. At least one mathematics course numbered higher than 626. 

2. 15 additional hours from the following: Mathematics 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 607, 
620, 623, 624, 651, 652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 715, 717, 720. 

3. An elective of 3 semester hours in education or mathematics or courses related to 
mathematics. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 
In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 



104 



Master of Science in Education, the student must satisfy the following: 

1. At least one mathematics course numbered higher than 626. 

2. 15 additional semester hours in mathematics from the following: Mathematics 
600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 607, 620, 623, 624, 651, 652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 715, 717, 720. 

3. A thesis focused on research in mathematics or in the teaching of mathematics. 

4. 3 hours of electives. 

SENIOR HIGH-JUNIOR COLLEGE CURRICULUM 

Non-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science degree in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. 9 semester hours in mathematics courses numbered higher than 626. 

2. 9 additional hours from the following: 600, 601, 602, 604, 607, 620, 623, 624, 651, 
652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 715, 717, 720. 

3. An elective of 3 semester hours in education or mathematics or courses related to 
mathematics. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science degree in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. 9 semester hours in mathematics courses numbered higher than 626. 

2. 9 additional hours from the following: Mathematics 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 607, 
620, 623, 624, 651, 652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 715, 717, 720. 

3. A thesis requiring research on a problem in the field of mathematics. 

4. 3 hours of electives. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

225-600. Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary 

School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Mathematics 3670) 
A study of the elementary theory of sets, elementary logic and postulational 
systems, the nature and methods of mathematical proofs, structure of the real num- 
ber system. Open only to inservice teachers, or by permission of Department of 
Mathematics. 

225-601. Algebraic Equations for Secondary Teachers 

(Formerly Math. 3671) 
Algebra of sets, solution sets for elementary equations, linear equations and linear 
systems of equations, matrices and determinants with applications to the solution of 
linear systems. Prerequisite: Math 600. 

225-601. Modern Algebra for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 3672) 
Sets and mappings, properties of binary operations, groups rings, integral domains, 
vector spaces and fields. Prerequisite: Math 600. 

225-603. Modern Analysis for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 3673) 
Properties of the real number system, functions, limits, sequences, continuity, dif- 
ferentiation and differentiability, integration and intergrability. Prerequisite: Math 
600. 



105 



225-604. Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 3674) 

Re-examination of Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and Hilbert axioms, in- 
troduction of projective geometry, other non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: 
Math 600. 

225-606. Mathematics for Chemists Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3676) 

This course will review those principles of mathematics which are involved in chem- 
ical computations and derivations from general through physical chemistry. It will in- 
clude a study of significant figures, methods of expressing large and small numbers, 
algebraic operations, trigonometric functions, and an introduction to calculus. 

225-607. Theory of Numbers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3677) 

Divisibility properties of the integers. Euclidean algorithm, congruences, diophan- 
tine equations, number-theoretic functions, and continued fractions. Prerequisite: 
Twenty hours of college mathematics. 

225-608. Mathematics of Life Insurance Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3678) 

Probability, mortality tables, life insurance, annuities, endowments; computation 
of net premiums; evaluation of policies; construction and use of tables. Prerequisite: 
Math 224. 

225-620. Elements of Set Theory and Topology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3682) 

Operations on sets, relations, correspondences, comparison of sets, functions, or- 
dered sets, general topological spaces, metric spaces, continuity, connectivity, com- 
pactness, hormeomerphic spaces, general properties of T-spaces. Prerequisite: Math 
222. 

225-623. Advanced Probability and Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3683) 

Introduction to probability, distribution functions and moment-generating func- 
tions, frequency distribution of two variables, development of chi-square, students' 
"T" and "F" distributions. Prerequisite: Math 222. 

225-624. Method of Applied Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math 3684) 

Presents the bases of various statistical procedures. Applications of normal, bi- 
nomial, Poisson, Chi-square, students' "T" and "F" distributions. Tests of hypothesis, 
power of tests, statistical inference, regression and correlation analysis and analysis 
of variance. Prerequisite: Math 224. 

For Undergraduate Student Only 

225-625. Modern Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I 

(Formerly Math. 3685) Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of mathematic language, sets, relations, number systems, bases, struc- 
tures, informal geometry, computation. No credit towards a degree in mathematics; 
not open to secondary school teachers of mathematics. Credit on elem. ed. degree. 

225-626. Modern Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II 

(Formerly 3686) Credit 3(3-0) 

106 



A continuation of Math. 725. Prerequisite: Math. 725 (Formerly 3685). No credit 
towards a degree in mathematics; not open to secondary school teachers of mathe- 
matics. Credit on elem. ed. degree. 

225-631. Linear and Non-Linear Programming Credit 3(3-0) 

Optimization subject to linear constraints; transportation problems; simplex 
method, network flows, applications of linear programming to industrial problems 
and economic theory. Introduction to non-linear programming. Prerequisite: Math 350 
and consent of the instructor. 

225-632. Games and Queue Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

General introduction to game theory; two-person-zero-sum-games; two-person-non- 
zero-sum-non-cooperative games; two-person co-operative games; reasonable out- 
comes and values; the minimax theorem. Introduction to queuing theory; single server 
queuing processes; many server queuing processes; applications to economics and 
business. Prerequisite: Mathematics 222 or Mathematics 117, Mathematics 224. 

225-651. Methods in Applied Mathematics I Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to complex variables and residue calculus, transform calculus 
(Fourier, Laplace, Hankel, Mellin, etc. Transforms), higher order partial differential 
equations governing various physical phenomena, non-homogeneous boundary value 
problems, orthogonal expansions, Green's functions and Variational principles. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 300. 

225-652. Methods of Applied Mathematics II Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to integral equations and conversion of differential problems into 
integral equations of Volterra and Fredholm types, solution by iteration and other 
methods, existence theoy, eigenvalue problems, Hilbert-Schmidt theory of symmetric 
kernels and topics in the calculus of variation, including optimization of integrals in- 
volving functions of more than one variable, Hamilton's principles, Strum-Liouville 
theory, Rayleigh-Ritz methods, etc. Prerequisite: Mathematics 300. 

For Graduate Students Only 

225-700. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3690) 
A study of point set theory, metric spaces, measurable sets, measurable functions, 
Lebesque integral of a bounded function, L spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 508 and 620. 

225-701. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3691) 
Continuation of Mathematics 700. 

225-710. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3692) 
A study of complex numbers, elementary functions, analytic functions, residue 
calculus, conformal mapping, Taylor and Laurent expansions. Prerequisite: Math. 
508. 

225-711. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3693) 
Continuation of Mathematics 710. 

225-715. Projective Geometry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3694) 

107 



A study of homogenenous coordinates, lineraly dependent points and lines, the prin- 
ciple of duality, harmonic points, harmonic lines, conies, projective and affine trans- 
formations. Prerequisites: Math. 601, 242, and 350. 

225-717. Special Topics in Algebra Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3695) 

A study of advanced topics in algebra which do not receive full development in the 
prerequisite courses. Prerequisite: Math. 5112 or Math. 520. 

225-720. Special Topics in Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3696) 

A study of advanced topics in analysis. 

225-730. Thesis Research in Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3699) 



MUSIC 

William McDaniel, Chairperson 

Office: Frazier Hall 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 
219-609. Music in Early Childhood Credit 3(2-2) 

A conceptual approach to the understanding of musical elements; an understand- 
ing of the basic activities in music in early childhood; modern trends in music educa- 
tion: Kodaly and Orff methods. 

219-610. Music in Elementary Schools Today Credit 3(2-2) 

Music in the elementary school curriculum; creating a musical environment in the 
classroom; child voice in singing, selection and presentation of rote songs; develop- 
ment of rhythmic and melodic expressions; directed listening; experimentation with 
percussion and simple melodic instruments; criteria for utilization of notational ele- 
ments; analysis of instrumental materials. 

219-611. Music in the Secondary Schools Today Credit 3(3-0) 

Techniques of vocal and instrumental music instruction in the junior and senior 
high schools; the general music class; the organization, administration and supervi- 
sion of music programs, as well as music in the humanities. This course includes the 
adolescent's voice and its care; the testing and classification of voices; operetta produc- 
tion; the instrumental program; and training glee clubs, choirs, bands, and instrumen- 
tal ensembles. 

219-614. Choral Conducting of School Music Groups Credit 2(0-4) 

Rehearsal techniques; balance; blend and relationship of parts to the total ensemble; 
analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in school at all levels of 
ability; conducting experience with laboratory group. 

219-616. Instrumental Conducting of School Music Groups Credit 2(0-4) 

Rehearsal technique; balance, blend and relationship of parts to the total ensemble; 
analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in school groups at all 
levels of ability; conducting experience with laboratory group. 

219-618. Psychology of Music Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive examination of the psychological bases of musical behavior. Special at- 

108 



tention devoted to the psychological processes involved in musical perception and the 
implications for music education. 

219-620. Advanced Music Appreciation Credit 3(2-2) 

Analytic studies of larger forms from all branches of music writing; special 
emphasis on style and structural procedures by principal composers; words taken 
from all periods in music history. Designed for students with previous study of music 
appreciation. 



PHYSICS 

Jason Gilchrist, Chairperson 

Office: 109 Cherry Hall 

For Graduate Students Only 

227-705. General Physics for Science Teachers I Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Physics 3885) 

For persons engaged in teaching. Includes two hours of lecture demonstration and 
one two-hour laboratory period per week. Emphasis is placed upon understanding the 
basic principles of physics. Both courses may be combined during a single semester for 
double credit. For teachers only. Prerequisite: College degree. 

227-706. General Physics for Science Teachers II Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Physics 3886) 

A continuation of Physics 705. 

227-707. Electricity for Science Teachers Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3887) 
Includes electric fields potentials, direct current circuits, chemical and thermal 
emfs electric meters and alternating currents. For teachers. Prerequisite: College 
Physics. 

227-708. Modern Physics for Science Teachers I Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3888) 

An introductory course covering the usual areas of modern physics. Both courses 
may be combined during a single semester for double credit. For teachers only. Pre- 
requisite: College Physics. 

227-709. Modern Physics for Science Teachers II Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3880) 

A continuation of Physics 708. 



PLANT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Samuel J. Dunn, Chairperson 

Office: 235 Carver Hall 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

130-601. Advanced Farm Shop Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Ag. Engr. 1476) 
Study of the care, operation, and maintenance of farm shop power equipment. Pre- 
requisite: Ag. Engr. 114. 



109 



130-602. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Ag. Engr. 1477) 

Special work in agricultural engineering on problems of special interest to the stu- 
dent. Open to seniors in Agricultural Engineering. 

130-700. Rural Electrification for Vocational Agricultural Teachers 

(Formerly 1489) Credit 3(3-0) 

Rural electrification for vocational teachers. A study of electricity with particular 
emphasis on its application to the home and farm. 

CROP SCIENCE 

130-603. Plant Chemicals Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Crop Science 1478) 

A study of the important chemical pesticides and growth regulators used in the pro- 
duction of economic plants. Prerequisites: Chem. 102 and PI. Sc. 300. 

130-604. Crop Ecology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Crop Science 1479) 

Study of the physical environment and its influence on crops; geographical distribu- 
tion of crops. 

130-605. Breeding of Crop Plants Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Crop Science 1480) 

Significance of crop improvements in the maintenance of crop yields; application of 
genetic principles and techniques used in the improvement of crops; the place of seed 
certification in the maintenance of varietal purity. 

130-606. Special Problems in Crops Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Crop Science 1481) 

Designed for students who desire to study special problems in crops. By consent of 
instructor. 

130-607. Research Design and Analysis Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Crop Science 1482) 

Experimental designs, methods and techniques of experimentation; application of 
experimental design to plant and animal research; interpretation of experimental 
data. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 644 or Math. 224. 

130-702. Grass Land Ecology Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 1491) 

The use of grasses and legumes in a dynamic approach to the theory and practice of 
grass-land agriculture, dealing with the fundamental ecological principles and their 
application to management practices. 

EARTH SCIENCE 

130-622. Environmental Sanitation and Waste Management Credit 3(2-2) 

Study of traditional and innovative patterns and problems of managing and han- 
dling waste products of urban and rural environments, their renovation and 
reclamation. 

130-624. Earth Science, Geomorphology Credit 3(2-2) 

Various land forms and their evolution — the naturally evolved surface features of 



110 



the Earth's crust and the processes responsible for their evolution, their relation to 
man's activities and as the foundation for understanding the environment. 

130-625. Earth Resources Credit 3(2-2) 

Conservation, management and use of renewable and non-renewable resources. 
Their impact on the social and economic quality of our environment. 

130-626. Aquaculture Credit 3(2-2) 

Using water as a natural resource in the production of food, for recreation and wild- 
life preservation, and its management as it relates to environmental problems af- 
fecting water quality, with major emphasis on freshwater lakes and ponds. 

130-627. Strategies of Conservation. Credit 3(2-2) 

An approach to the teaching of environmental conservation as an integral part of 
the general curriculum. 

EARTH SCIENCE 

130-703. Topics in Earth Science Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 1492) 

A discussion of special topics from astronomy, geology, soil genesis, meteorology, 
oceanography, and physical geography. 

130-704. Problem Solving in Earth Science Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly 1493) 

A laboratory-demonstration course involving identification of earth materials, 
measurements in environmental processes, and field observation of natural physical 
phenomena. 

130-705. The Physical Universe Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Earth Sc. 1494) 

This course is designed to give the student a broad general background knowledge of 
the earth's physical environment; its lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere and 
their interaction on weather and climate. The physical nature of the stars, the sun, 
and the planets will also be studied in the light of modern concepts of space. 

130-706. Physical Geology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Earth Sc. 1495) 

The development of the earth's surface, its material composition and forces acting 
upon its surface will be considered. Specific topics include origin of mountains and 
volcanos, causes of earthquake, work of rivers, wind, waves and glaciers. Prerequi- 
site: Ea. Sci. 705 or consent of instructor. 

130-708. Conservation of Natural Resources Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Earth Sc. 1496) 
A descriptive course dealing with conservation and development of renewable 
natural resources encompassing soil, water, and air; cropland, grassland, and forests; 
livestock, fish, and wildlife; and recreational, aesthetic and scenic values. Attention 
will be given to protection and development of the nation's renewable natural 
resources base as an essential part of the national security, defense, and welfare. 

130-709. Seminar in Earth Science Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 1497) 
A seminar concerned with recent developments in the earth sciences and related 
disciplines. 

Ill 



HORTICULTURE 

130-608. Special Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Hort. 1483) 

Work among special lines given largely by the project method for advanced under- 
graduate and graduate students who have the necessary preparation. 

130-610. Commercial Greenhouse Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1449) 

Culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse and out-of-doors with emphasis on 
cut flowers and outside bedding plants. Special attention given to seasonal production. 
Prerequisite: Hort. 334. 

130-611. Commercial Greenhouse Production Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1450) 

Culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse with emphasis on pot plants and con- 
servatory plants. Special attention given to seasonal production. Prerequisite: Hort. 
334. 

130-612. Plant Materials and Landscape Maintenance Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1425) 

Identification, merits, adaptability, and maintenance of shrubs, trees, and vines 
used in landscape planting, planting trees, shrubs, bulbs, and perennials. Prerequi- 
site: Hort. 334, 335. 

130-613. Plant Materials and Planning Design Credit Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1453) 

Continuation of Horticulture 612 with added emphasis on plant combinations and 
use of plants as design elements. Prerequisite: Hort. 612. 

SOIL SCIENCE 

130-609. Special Problems in Soils Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Soil Sci. 1484) 

Research problems in soil for advanced students. By consent of instructor. 

For Graduate Students Only 

130-710. Soils of North Carolina Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Soils 1498) 

A study of the factors basic to the understanding of the soils of North Carolina, 
their classification and properties as related to sound land-use and management. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Amarjit Singh, Acting Chairperson 

Office: 308 Hodgin Hall 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

237-640. Federal Government Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2976) 
After a brief review of the structure and functions of the federal government, this 
course concerns itself with special areas of federal government: problems of national 

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defense, the government as a promoter, the government as regulator, etc. Students 
will engage in in-depth study in one of the specific areas under consideration. 

238-641. State Government Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2977) 

An in-depth study of special problems connected with operations of state and local 
governments. 

237-642. Modern Political Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5973) 

Includes selected political works for adherence to modern conceptions of the state, 
political institutions as well as the works of Machiaveli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Rousseau, 
Burke, Mill, Hegel, Marx, and Dewey. 

237-643. Urban Politics and Government Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5975) 

A detailed analysis of the urban political arena including political machinery, eco- 
nomic forces and political structures of local governmental units. 

237-645. American Foreign Policy— 1945 to Present Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2976) 

Examination of forces and policies that have emerged from Potsdam, Yalta, and 
World War II. Emphasis will be on understanding the policies that were formulated, 
how they were formulated, why they were formulated, the consequences of the for- 
mulation, and the alternative policies that may have come about. Prerequisites: Sur- 
vey course in American history, American Diplomatic History, and consent of instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limit of 15 students. 

237-646. The Politics of Developing Nations Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5974) 

Political structures and administrative practices of selected countries in Africa, 
Latin America, Asia. Analysis of particular cultural, social and economic variable 
peculiar to the nations. 

237-648. Urban Planning in the American Political System Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of issues involved in effective short and long range planning solu- 
tions to urban problems, and the politics of the urban planning process. Topics in- 
clude: history of contemporary urban planning, comprehensive planning; urban 
growth patterns; land and energy conservation; and current urban plans and policies. 

237-650. Seminar in Asian Politics Credit 3(3-0) 

Development of political ideas and institutions with emphasis on dynamics of 
political modernization, problems of nation-building, political authority, political par- 
ties, and growth of political leadership at the rural and local levels. 

237-653. Urban Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of some of the major problems in contemporary urban America. The 
course includes an examination of their causes, effects and possible solutions. 

237-655. Public Personnel Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the leading trends in public employment, including recruitment, 
training, retention, interpersonal interaction, and collective bargaining. 



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For Graduate Students Only 

237-730. Constitutional Development Since 1865 Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly His. 2896) 

Historical study of the development of the Constitution since 1865. Treatment will 
be given to important Constitutional decisions, major documents, major Supreme 
Court decisions, and public policy. Assignments in paperback books will be frequent. 

237-741. Comparative Government Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2899) 

Comparative analysis of the American system of government and selected foreign 
governments. Administration, organization, and processes in these systems of govern- 
ment will also be considered. 



SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION 

I. Barnett, Chairperson 

Office: Price 112 

SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 
360-651. Driver Ed. and Teaching Training Credit 3(2-2) 

This course provides the student with the necessary preparation to administer the 
in-car phase of high school driver education. Special attention will be given to methods 
of developing safe driving skills and habits. 

360-652. Advanced Driver Education and Teacher Training Credit 3(2-2) 

Advanced professional preparation in teaching driver education. Laboratory ex- 
perience with the multiple care range and driving simulator. Prerequisite: S.D. Ed. 
651 or its equivalent. 

360-653. Driver Education and General Safety Credit 3(3-3) 

Designed to present facts and information concerning the cost, in money and human 
suffering, of accidents in the home, industry, school, and transportation. Included in 
the establishment of knowledge and background conducive to the development of per- 
sonal activities and practices which reduce accidents. 

360-654. Highway Transportation Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

A description and analytical study of the various transportation systems that have 
developed in this country. Special emphasis will be given to transportation and its role 
on economic and social development of communities within this country. 

360-655. Automotive Technology for Safety and 

Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the functional systems of the automobiles as they relate to traffic safety. 

360-656. Highway Traffic Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is to study the origin of traffic laws, the administration of motor vehi- 
cles and the adjudication resulting from traffic offenses. A critical analysis of traffic 
management procedure: past, present, and future. Also explore the agencies involved 
with traffic study. (Consent of instructor.) 

360-657. Traffic Engineering in Safety and Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 

An investigation of the vehicle and environmental components of the various types 

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of highway transportation systems. Particular emphasis is given to highway engineer- 
ing in relation to the flow of traffic in congested and non-congested areas. Traffic 
studies are performed within the traffic engineering functions, and traffic planning to 
improve the efficiency of traffic flow and control, and to meet future needs of society. 

360-658. Curriculum Integration of Safety Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Integration of safety concepts and principles in the kindergarten through grade 
twelve curricula. Philosophy and psychology of safety; strategies, techniques, and 
materials appropriate for the various grade levels. 

360-659. Motorcycle Safety Education Credit 3(2-2) 

Theory and laboratory sessions in motorcycle safety education. Emphasis on laws, 
maintenance, skills, and safe riding habits and practices. 

For Graduate Students Only 

360-750. Innovations in Safety and Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Workshop or institute dealing with contemporary problems and methods in safety 
and driver education. 

360-751. Psychological Factors in Safety and Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of psychological variables influencing the driver's behavior. Emphasis on 
emotional, attitudinal, psychophysical, and social characteristics prevalent in the traf- 
fic scene. 

360-752. Alcohol and Safety and Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Consideration of the psychological and physical aspects of alcohol and its resulting 
problems on the traffic scene. 

360-755. School and Occupational Safety Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of Occupational Safety and Health Act in the school. Organization and ad- 
ministration of school safety programs including recordkeeping, inspection, building 
and grounds, facilities, personnel, transportation, materials, and occupational health 
hazards. 

360-756. Seminar in Safety and Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Presentation and consideration of safety and traffic education research, issues and 
problems. Relationships within school, community and related agencies. 

360-757. Administration and Supervision of Safety and 

Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Organization, administration, and supervision of safety and driver education pro- 
grams. Methods of organization, techniques, materials, program planning, records 
and reports, financing and insurance, procurement, personnel selection, planning and 
securing facilities. 

360-758. Independent Project in Safety and Driver Education Credit 3(1-3) 

Study on an individual or group basis in the field of safety and driver education. In 
consultation with an adviser. 

360-759. Thesis Research in Safety an Driver Education Credit 3(3-0) 



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SECONDARY EDUCATION AND CURRICULUM 

Dorothy Prince Barnett, Chairperson 

Office: 201 Hodgin Hall 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 
311-602. Extramural Studies II Credit 1-3 

Off-campus experiences with educational programs of agencies, organizations, in- 
stitutions or business which gives first hand experiences with youth and adults and 
aspects of education. Project report and evaluation by permission of department. 

311-605. Concepts of Career Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Career Education and manpower concepts in a changing society with emphasis on 
career awareness, career exploration, and career preparation for kindergarten 
through the postsecondary level. Development of career education models and evalua- 
tion schema. 

311-606. Curricular Integration of Career Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

Integration of Career Education within subject content areas. Special attention to 
mathematics, social science, science, humanities, and career-oriented programs. 

311-607. Administration of Career Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

The organization and implementation of Career Education Programs. Includes 
methods of models for inservice training for teachers and counselors. Evaluation of 
Career Education Programs. 

311-608. Seminar in Career Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of literature, research, issues and problems in Career Education. 

311-625. Theory of American Public Education Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the philosophical resources, objectives, historical influences, 
social organization, administration, support, and control of public education in the 
United States. 

311-626. History of American Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the historical development of education in the United States, emphasiz- 
ing educational concepts and practices as they relate to political, social and cultural 
developments in the growth of a system of public education. 

311-627. The Afro- American Experience in American Education Credit 3(3-0) 
Lectures, discussions, and research in the Afro-American in American education, 
including the struggle for literacy, contributions of Afro-Americans to theory, phil- 
osophy and practice of education in the public schools, private and higher education. 
Traces the development of school desegregation, its problems and plans. 

311-628. Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education Credit 3(1-4) 

A synthesis of practical experiences, ideas and issues pertinent to more effective 
teaching in urban areas. 

311-641. Teaching the Culturally Disadvantaged Learner Credit 3(3-0) 

Psychological and sociological influences on culturally deprived learners and their 
development; emphasis on the experiential lacks of the culturally deprived learner; 
and special teaching methods, materials and activities. A consideration of groups of 
American Indians, Negroes, Puerto Ricans, urban poor, rural poor, Mexican Ameri- 
cans, Mountain whites, and migrant workers who may be culturally deprived. 

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Graduate Students Only 
311-700. Introduction to Graduate Study Credit 2(2-0) 

Methods of research, interpretation of printed research data, and use of biblio- 
graphical tools. 

311-701. Philosophy of Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical study of and a philosophic approach to educational problems. The nature 
and aims of education in a democratic society, relation of the individual to society, in- 
terests and disciplines, play and work, freedom and control, subject matter and 
method. 

311-702. Reading in Modern Philosophy of Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Study and analysis of selected topics in philosophy of education. 

311-703. Educational Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

The school as a social institution, school-community relations, social control of 
education, and structure of school society. 

311-710. Methods and Techniques of Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Careful analysis and study of research problems; techniques and methods of 
approach. 

311-711. Educational Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

The essential vocabulary, concepts, and techniques of descriptive statistics as ap- 
plies to problems in education and psychology. 

311-720. Curriculum Development Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts and modern trends in curriculum development for grades K-12; the 
purposes, objectives, and programs of the school; the relationship of allied subject 
areas to curriculum development; the relationship of the community; and the con- 
tributions and interrelationships of administrative personnel, other personnel, and 
lay persons to curriculum development. 

311-722. Curriculum in the Secondary School Credit 3(3-0) 

Curriculum development, functions of the secondary school, types of curricula; 
emphasis on trends, issues, and innovations. 

311-723. Principles of Teaching Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the status of teaching as a profession in the United States; teacher 
obligations, responsibilities and opportunities for leadership in the classroom and 
community with special emphasis on principles of and procedures in teaching. 

311-724. Problems and Trends in Teaching Science Credit 3(3-0) 

Attention to major problems of the high school teacher of science. Lesson plans, as- 
signments, tests, etc., constructed and administered by each student in class. Audio- 
visual materials, demonstration and laboratory techniques carried out. 

311-725. Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

Survey of major problems in the broad field of social studies and consideration of 
improved ways of presentation and class economy, including lesson plans, assign- 
ments, audio-visual materials, and other means of facilitating learning. 

311-727. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics for 

Junior and Senior High School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

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Model lesson plans, use of educational media, geometric and trigonometric devices, 
Truth Tables, and intuitive and formal logic in the teaching of modern mathematics in 
the junior and senior high school. 

311-780. Comparative Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical and international factors influencing the development of national 
systems of education, recent changes in educational programs of various countries. 

311-782. Issues in Secondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the role of the high school as an educational agency in a democracy. 
Attention is given to: (1) philosophical, psychological, and sociological bases for the 
selection of learning experiences; (2) contrasting approaches to curriculum construc- 
tion; (3) teaching methods and materials; (4) evaluation procedures; and (5) school- 
community relationships. 

311-784. Current Research in Secondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical analysis of the current research in secondary education and the implica- 
tions of such for high school educative experiences. 

311-S785. Independent Readings in Education I Credit 1(0-2) 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prerequi- 
site: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

311-S786. Independent Readings in Education II Credit 2(2-4) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Pre- 
requisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

311-S787. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3(0-6) 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prerequi- 
site: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

311-S790. Seminar in Educational Problems Credit 3(1-4) 

Intensive study, investigation, or research in selected areas of education; reports 
and constructive criticism. Prerequisites: A minimum of 24 hours in prescribed 
graduate courses. 

311-S791. Thesis Research Credit 3 



SPEECH AND DRAMA 

Mary Moore, Chairperson 

Office: 304 Crosby Hall 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students 

610. Phonetics 

Broad transcription: The International Phonetic Alphabet; Standards of pronun- 
ciation; dialectal variations in America; physiological and accoustical bases of speech 
sounds. Prerequisite: Speech 250 or Consent of Instructor. 

620. Community and Creative Dramatics Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and function of creative dramatics and applications in elementary educa- 
tion; demonstrations with children; special problems for graduate students. 

633. Speech for Teachers Credit 2(2-0) 

Study and application of the fundamental principles of oral communication related 

to teaching and learning; speech activities and interpersonal relations identified both 

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with teaching and learning and the teaching profession; exercises for self- 
improvement in the various speech processes. Not open to majors in the Department 
of Speech and Theatre. 

636. Persuasive Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the theory and practice of persuasive speaking in the democratic society, 
including formal and informal persuasive speaking, types of proof, and the ethics of 
persuasion. Practice in the preparation and presentation of persuasive messages. Pre- 
requisite: Speech 250. 

637. Television Production 

Methods and techniques in television production, directing and announcing; 
program design, lighting, audio, camera, and electronic techniques. Laboratory prac- 
tice. (Junior and Senior standing required) 

638. Television in Education 

The uses of television for instructional purposes. Production and preparation of 
television educational programs. Laboratory practice. (Junior and Senior standing 
required) 

650. Theatre Workshop Credit 3-6(0-6) 

A practicum involving the total theatrical experience. Involves units in acting, 
directing, stagecraft, designing and other such activities. Approximately 90 clock 
hours are devoted to technical production. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of 
instructor. 



SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Frances Logan, Chairperson 

Office: 251 Carver Hall 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

SOCIOLOGY 

235-600. Seminar in Social Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Personal and social values as related to social planning; planning and evaluation. 
Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing. 

235-670. Law and Society Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines selected and representative forms of social justice and in- 
justices: barriers and opportunities for legal redress, as related to contemporary 
issues. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 

235-671. Advanced Research Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of Sociology 403. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing; minimum 
of 6-9 credits in statistics and/or research. 

235-699. Small Groups Credit 3(3-0) 

Elements and characteristics of small group behavior and process. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing. 



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